‘Journey’ creator’s Apple-exclusive ‘Sky’ officially launches July 11th


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Thatgamecompany’s Sky: Children of the Light has technically been available in beta for a long time, but now it’s really, truly ready for launch… well, almost. The Journey creator’s social exploration game is now slated to reach iOS and Apple TV users on July 11th, with the App Store offering pre-orders (it’s listed as free) as we write this. If you’ll recall, this is an Apple device exclusive — don’t expect an Android counterpart to arrive any time soon.

Via: Sky (Twitter), App Store (Twitter)

Source: App Store, Thatgamecompany (YouTube)

‘Journey’ creator’s Apple-exclusive ‘Sky’ officially launches July 11th


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Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Thatgamecompany’s Sky: Children of the Light has technically been available in beta for a long time, but now it’s really, truly ready for launch… well, almost. The Journey creator’s social exploration game is now slated to reach iOS and Apple TV users on July 11th, with the App Store offering pre-orders (it’s listed as free) as we write this. If you’ll recall, this is an Apple device exclusive — don’t expect an Android counterpart to arrive any time soon.

Via: Sky (Twitter), App Store (Twitter)

Source: App Store, Thatgamecompany (YouTube)

macOS Catalina first look: Sidecar, Project Catalyst and Voice Control


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After Apple wrapped its WWDC keynote today, the developers went to coding sessions and the press, well, mostly showed themselves out. As it happens, we later had a chance to see most of the new software in action in private demos. First, an important caveat: These demos were guided and hands-off, meaning we haven’t yet had a chance to install the software on our own devices and use it as our daily driver. But, until these platforms launch in beta this summer, it’s helpful to have had a chance to see these OSes in use, outside of what turned out to be a packed, fast-moving keynote. When Apple is demoing software on stage, you can easily blink and miss a mention of a new feature, or totally miss how it actually works.

In the video above, we take a look at macOS Catalina and three of its more notable features: Continue reading “macOS Catalina first look: Sidecar, Project Catalyst and Voice Control”

iPadOS first look: Desktop-class browsing, better multitasking and more


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We knew Apple would make major changes to iOS on the iPad, but we didn’t think the company would take things a step further and announce iPadOS. (Not until Apple quietly let the news slip ahead of its WWDC keynote, anyway.) Craig Federighi, Apple’s SVP of software engineering, says the process of using the iPad has become a “truly distinct” experience, one that requires special attention beyond that which goes into phone-centric versions of iOS. Needless to say, iPads stand to gain a lot when this new software becomes available later this year.

iOS 13 first look: Dark mode, Maps and more


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A dark mode. A swipe-friendly keyboard. A slew of redesigned apps. These are just a few of the things you’ll find in Apple’s new iOS 13 release, but here’s the rub: unless you’re a developer, you can’t actually try any of these new features until they become available in a public beta later this summer. (And even then, most of you will probably want to wait until iOS 13’s official release this September.)

War Stories: How This War of Mine manipulates your emotions


This post is by Lee Hutchinson from Ars Technica


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This video contains some minor spoilers for a non-critical location in the game.

Video shot by Dawid Kurowski, edited by John Cappello. Click here for transcript.

Chances are good that you already have This War of Mine in your Steam library. The side-view, survival-horror adventure game is a perennial favorite on various Steam sales, and at least 4.5 million people have picked up a copy since its release in 2014. But as with many Steam sale titles, it’s perhaps a bit less likely that you’ve played the game—and if you haven’t, that’s a shame, because it’s damn good.

But it’s also a hard game to experience—and I’m not talking about the difficulty level. This War of Mine’s developers are Polish, and they come from a country and a culture that still bears the scars of post-war Nazi occupation. Lead programmer Aleksander Kauch explained that one of the primary things

Continue reading “War Stories: How This War of Mine manipulates your emotions”

Mac security hole reportedly lets attackers bypass app safeguards


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Apple may have another Gatekeeper security flaw on its hands. Researcher Filippo Cavallarin has detailed a macOS vulnerability that he said would let attackers install malware without the usual permission request. As Gatekeeper considers network shares to be ‘safe’ locations that don’t require permission checks, an intruder just has to trick the user into mounting one of those shares to run the apps they like. A maliciously crafted ZIP file with the right symbolic link could automatically steer you to an attacker-owned site, for example, and it would be easy to trick someone into launching a hostile app — say, a virus masquerading as a document folder.

Via: 9to5Mac

Source: Filippo Cavallarin

War Stories: Lucas Pope and what almost sunk Return of the Obra Dinn


This post is by Lee Hutchinson from Ars Technica


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Video shot and edited by Justin Wolfson. Click here for transcript.

Lucas Pope is an important name in modern gaming—not only did he help bring us Uncharted and Uncharted 2, but he’s also responsible for the indie smash hit Papers, Please, which managed to pack a surprising amount of storytelling and emotion into what is effectively a document stamping simulator.

But we’re particularly fond of Pope’s 2018 murder mystery Return of the Obra Dinn, where players must figure out what happened to all 60 souls aboard a ship that has turned up in port bereft of life (think sort of a mash-up of Clue and Event Horizon). The game’s low-fi monochrome graphical style is meant to evoke 80s- and 90s-era Macintosh adventure games, and it works stunningly well—the stark polygonal shapes and 1-bit stipple-shading are instantly evocative of the era. (For me, firing up Obra Dinn

Continue reading “War Stories: Lucas Pope and what almost sunk Return of the Obra Dinn”

Apple’s new TV app is a work in progress


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Apple’s approach to digital video can best be described as slow and steady. While iTunes and the iPod effortlessly transformed the way we purchased and listened to music, it took the company years to figure out how to position the Apple TV. For the most part, films and TV were just additional categories in iTunes, which, as its name implies, was primarily focused on music. But now that Apple finally has a solid 4K set-top box, the next issue is helping people organize everything they have to watch.

Snapthread 2.0 Adds a Refined UI, an Improved iPad Experience, and New Tools


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When I first covered Snapthread early last year, you could tell where it was headed. The app was conceived initially by developer Becky Hansmeyer as a way to combine Snapchat videos. By last January though, the app had evolved into a general-purpose solution for quickly and easily stitching together Live Photos, still photos, and short videos that could be shared on any social network or directly with friends and family. With version 2.0, which is out today, Hansmeyer has refined the existing user experience, added useful new functionality without complicating the app, and leveraged the iPad to create a more versatile video creation tool that works equally well for quickly sharing your creations on social networks as it does with small groups of friends and family.

The core functionality of Snapthread hasn’t changed, so if you’d like to learn more about how to combine Live Photos, still images, and

Changes to Snapthread's UI give it a more expansive feel and places users' focus on their video project.
Snapthread includes a large set of keyboard shortcuts on the iPad.
Snapthread's looping and filter tools.

Continue reading “Snapthread 2.0 Adds a Refined UI, an Improved iPad Experience, and New Tools”

Amazon’s Ring could finally get HomeKit support


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The wait for Amazon’s Ring video doorbell to integrate with Apple’s HomeKit could soon be over. Ring has long promised HomeKit support, but it’s faced repeated delays. Now, it looks like Ring’s Video Doorbell Pro and Spotlight Cam have earned HomeKit certification. A Twitter user spotted the change on Apple’s MFi licensing page.

Source: 9to5mac

After a few misfires, Army’s newest pistol program is slow on the draw


This post is by Sean Gallagher from Ars Technica


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(video link)

After a nearly decade-long effort to pick a new pistol for the US military, the Army’s Program Executive Office‑Soldier awarded its Modular Handgun System (MHS) contract to SIG Sauer on January 19, 2017. More than two years later, the Army says that the program is still on track for planned purchases—but the Army’s budget requests for 2020 indicate that the service is slowing its draw for at least the next year.

The MHS program is the Army’s effort to replace the pistol that has been the standard military sidearm since 1986—the Beretta M9, which had been the Army’s first service-wide pistol since the venerable Colt M1911 .45 caliber pistol. SIG Sauer’s pistols for the MHS program are based on SIG Sauer’s P320 pistol—a favorite of law enforcement. Like the Beretta M9, both the full-size XM-17 and compact XM-18 are chambered for 9-millimeter bullets. But the MHS pistols are

Continue reading “After a few misfires, Army’s newest pistol program is slow on the draw”

After a few misfires, Army’s newest pistol program is slow on the draw


This post is by Sean Gallagher from Ars Technica


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




(video link)

After a nearly decade-long effort to pick a new pistol for the US military, the Army’s Program Executive Office‑Soldier awarded its Modular Handgun System (MHS) contract to SIG Sauer on January 19, 2017. More than two years later, the Army says that the program is still on track for planned purchases—but the Army’s budget requests for 2020 indicate that the service is slowing its draw for at least the next year.

The MHS program is the Army’s effort to replace the pistol that has been the standard military sidearm since 1986—the Beretta M9, which had been the Army’s first service-wide pistol since the venerable Colt M1911 .45 caliber pistol. SIG Sauer’s pistols for the MHS program are based on SIG Sauer’s P320 pistol—a favorite of law enforcement. Like the Beretta M9, both the full-size XM-17 and compact XM-18 are chambered for 9-millimeter bullets. But the MHS pistols are

Continue reading “After a few misfires, Army’s newest pistol program is slow on the draw”

Video: Slay the Spire is a friendly game of death, but it was hard to get it right


This post is by Sam Machkovech from Ars Technica


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Video directed by Justin Wolfson, edited by John Cappello. Click here for transcript.

Normally, we devote our “War Stories” videos to established and classic games of old. So what is a 2019 video game doing here?

Anyone who asks this question about Slay the Spire, made by a three-person studio in Seattle, hasn’t played this wonderful title. It’s arguably the most addictive, accessible, and strategy-filled digital card game we’ve seen in years. So we wanted to talk to its dealers about the game’s irresistible properties.

The result is the above interview, which is peppered with developer Mega Crit’s insights (and at least one Easter egg). We’re glad we sought out this younger team, because their answers revolved largely around the Steam Early Access system, which is still a pretty small drop in the bucket of game design history. Designers Anthony Giovannetti and Casey Yano sought a passionate

Continue reading “Video: Slay the Spire is a friendly game of death, but it was hard to get it right”

Upgrade, Reuse, Recycle: Earth Day Friendly Solutions


This post is by Tom Nelson from Other World Computing Blog


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49 years ago, April 22, 1970, Earth Day was born, at a time when many cities in the US were covered in hazy smog. Pollution in many forms was contributing to environmental problems, causing health concerns, and many species were becoming lost to us, not to be seen again.

On the first Earth Day, many of us spent the day cleaning up roads, rivers, or ocean beaches. The spirit of that first Earth Day helped move forward the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Clean Water Act, and the Endangered Species Act.

This Earth Day we can celebrate the recovery of many species and their habitat. Our cities generally have much cleaner skies, and our dirtiest rivers have become places where life now thrives.

Earth Day reminds us there is always more to do, and not everything requires large-scale projects. In many cases, just like during that first Earth

Continue reading “Upgrade, Reuse, Recycle: Earth Day Friendly Solutions”

OWC RADiO Podcast – NAB 2019 – Michael Kammes, BeBop


This post is by Mike @ MacSales.com from Other World Computing Blog


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Join host Carina Catania as she interviews Michael Kammes the Director of Business Development at BeBop Technology as they discuss why he wanted to work at a startup and how BeBop wants to change how media creation can change to use cloud computing vs relying on 100% local editing workflows.

 

Mobile Video Production Spotlighted at the 2019 NAB Show


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Every year, the National Association of Broadcasters holds a trade show spotlighting advancements in technology in the media and entertainment industries. Jeff Benjamin, who produces much of 9to5Mac’s video content, was on hand for the show this week and reports that mobile video production was one of the highlights of the show:

The first thing that I noticed about this year’s show, is that some of the major players in the mobile video editing space planned their booths to be adjacent to one another. This was a smart move, as it created a stronger presence for mobile video editing than in years before.

I also noticed that there was a significant uptick in foot traffic than in the past. Some of this can be attributed to the way the booths were organized, but I feel like mobile video editing has gained more legitimacy as a whole as people Continue reading “Mobile Video Production Spotlighted at the 2019 NAB Show”

Apple Spotlights the Use of Its Products at Work in ‘The Underdog’


This post is by John Voorhees from MacStories


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The Caffè Macs pizza box was already something of a legend, but now it has its own Apple video too.

Earlier today, Apple posted a three-minute video title ‘The Underdogs’ which tells the story of a group of co-workers who stumble into the opportunity to pitch their idea for a round pizza box to their bosses. One of the group is rear-ended in a company parking lot at the start of the day. To make amends, a meeting to pitch the box is arranged.

The quartet of co-workers gets to work turning a simple sketch of a round pizza box into a finished product in a few days’ time. They use a combination of Macs, iPhones, iPad Pros, and the Apple Watch running a variety of apps including Microsoft Office apps like Excel, a 3D-design tool, and an AR app to get the job done. The video closes with the Continue reading “Apple Spotlights the Use of Its Products at Work in ‘The Underdog’”

More Tips for Mojave’s Screenshot App


This post is by Tom Nelson from Other World Computing Blog


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With the release of macOS Mojave, the ability to take screenshots underwent a bit of a change. Gone is the old Grab screenshot utility; in its place is the new and improved Screenshot app. And while the new Screenshot app brings new capabilities, the old keyboard shortcuts that you’re used to using are still present, and work as expected.

That makes transitioning to the new Screenshot app a fairly easy task.

In this Rocket Yard guide, we’ll look at how to take advantage of the new Screenshot app, with a number of tips and a few tricks.

Screenshot App
Let’s start with what hasn’t changed. Although the app has a new name (Screenshot), it’s still located in the /Applications/Utilities folder. If you used to have Grab installed in the Dock, you can drag the Screenshot app to the Dock as its replacement.

All of the keyboard shortcuts you used

Continue reading “More Tips for Mojave’s Screenshot App”

Apple’s latest iPhone ad promises privacy matters


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In a follow-up to its trolly CES banner ads, Apple just debuted a new commercial that again centers the iPhone as a more privacy-conscious option than the competition. Titled “Privacy on iPhone — Private Side,” it focuses on how much we all value privacy, whether you’re a wiseguy in a diner or a kid passing notes in class. It’s tied up with the tagline “If privacy matters in your life, it should matter to the phone your life is on.”

Source: Apple (YouTube)