Apple’s new Logic Pro X is built for the Mac Pro


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Apple boasted that the redesigned Mac Pro could easily handle the most demanding audio editing tasks, and now the software is ready for it. The tech firm has updated its Logic Pro X music editing app to support the new workstation’s many cores, handling up to a whopping 56 processing threads. That lets the Mac Pro juggle up to 1,000 audio and software instrument tracks, or four times as many as the old computer. You won’t be hurting for power if you’re composing an elaborate orchestral piece for the latest Hollywood blockbuster.

Source: Apple Newsroom

Apple might wave goodbye to Dashboard in macOS Catalina


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One of the Mac’s longer-serving features appears to be going away. Appleosophy and others using the developer preview of macOS Catalina have discovered that Dashboard, the secondary screen for widgets, isn’t present. The app is missing in Launchpad, and you can’t even force it to appear using Terminal. We wouldn’t completely rule out a return in a later beta, but iTunes also has a missing icon and is clearly falling out of favor.

Via: MacRumors

Source: Appleosophy

What to expect from Apple at WWDC 2019


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Next week, thousands of people will flock to San Jose, California; nestle into their seats at the Convention Center; and listen to Apple unspool its vision for the future of software. They’ll get their first concrete look at iOS 13 and learn what it means for their phones and tablets. They’ll hear more about how the gap between iOS and Mac apps is starting to shrink — albeit slowly. They might even get an early look at some new Pro-level hardware. And since we’ll be there covering the show in full, you’ll hear all about that stuff as soon as we do.

Thanks to AR, the Statue of Liberty is more accessible than ever


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Rather than build the Statue of Liberty in such a way that its 200,000-lb copper shell stood upright on its own, Gustave Eiffel — the man behind the eponymous tower — designed it around a massive inner framework. You might have already known this, but it’s the kind of detail that doesn’t often spring to mind unless you’re 1) a French/American history buff or 2) someone who has already been inside the thing. Thankfully, to coincide with the opening of the official Statue of Liberty museum this week, there’s a new AR-focused iOS app to give visitors and the far-flung curious an up-close look at France’s majestic gift to the US.

Apple Aperture won’t run in macOS after Mojave


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You’ll need a backup plan if you’ve been hanging on to Aperture years after its retirement. Apple has warned that its pro photo editing tool won’t run in versions of macOS released after Mojave (that is, the upcoming 2019 release and beyond). If you want to access your Aperture libraries beyond that, you’ll have to migrate them to either Photos or Adobe’s Lightroom Classic. This isn’t a total shock when Apple hasn’t updated the software for five years (and hasn’t even offered downloads in four years), but it could prove a headache if you’ve been deeply attached to Aperture’s methods.

Via: MacRumors

Source: Apple

Developers love Python and TypeScript, get paid for Clojure, and aren’t using blockchain


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Stack Overflow’s annual developer survey was published this week, giving an insight into the skills, experience, and opinions of a wide slice of the developer community. Since its launch in 2008, Stack Overflow has become an essential developer tool, offering copy/paste solutions to an ever-growing number of programming problems.

The Stack Overflow survey is particularly interesting, as Stack Overflow does not focus on any one kind of developer or development; is used by professionals, students, and hobbyists alike; and has substantial use across Europe, North America, and Asia, with respectable representation from South America, Africa, and Oceania. As such, it gives a view of the software development industry as a whole, across all fields and disciplines.

To the surprise of nobody, Web technology remains top of the usage chart: some 67.8 percent of developers use JavaScript, giving it the number one position; and 63.5 percent use HTML

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The next macOS may include separate Music and Podcasts apps


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Never mind attempts to slim down iTunes — on the Mac, Apple might shove it to the side. In the wake of some sleuthing by coder Steve Troughton-Smith, 9to5Mac claims that the next version of macOS will include separate Music and Podcasts apps on top of the redesigned TV app. They would run using Marzipan (the technology that enables porting iOS apps to the Mac), and are likely to be functionally similar to whatever you see in this year’s version of iOS.

Source: 9to5Mac

Hello world: Shining a light onto the culture of computer programmers


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Attendees working on Apple Inc. laptop computers participate in the TechCrunch Disrupt London 2015 Hackathon.

Enlarge / Attendees working on Apple Inc. laptop computers participate in the TechCrunch Disrupt London 2015 Hackathon. (credit: Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

Almost every aspect of our daily lives is now shaped in some way by computer code. Yet the average person on the street has no idea how this all works or just how much influence developers now quietly wield in society. Tech journalist Clive Thompson is on a mission to change that with his new book, Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World.

Before he was a tech journalist, Thompson was a high school hacker who taught himself to code on early personal computers like the Commodore 64. His prior book, Smarter Than You Think: How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better, pushed back against the doomsayers convinced that new technological tools are rotting our brains, arguing that such things actually boost

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iOS pirates are using Apple’s developer certificates to share hacked apps


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Just days after it was revealed that dozens of gambling and pornographic apps have been abusing enterprise certificates to distribute apps outside of Apple’s app store, Reuters has found that software pirates have been using the same process to distribute hacked versions of popular apps such as Spotify, Minecraft and Pokemon Go. The apps have been modified to block in-app advertising and make paid-for features available for free.

Source: Reuters

Windows 10 October 2018 Update still not released, running out of October


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Who doesn't love some new Windows?

Enlarge / Who doesn’t love some new Windows? (credit: Peter Bright / Flickr)

Microsoft is making yet more fixes to Windows 10 build 17763, the build that has been blessed as the Windows 10 October 2018 Update.

The update was initially published on the second Tuesday of the month, but within a few days Microsoft had to pull the update due to a bug that could cause data loss. It turned out that the bug had been reported numerous times during the preview period, but for whatever reason Microsoft had overlooked or ignored the feedback items describing the problem.

Microsoft fixed that particular bug and sent the fixed build to Windows Insiders to test. The fixes published today include a fix for another widely reported (but apparently ignored) bug when dragging files from .ZIP archives in Explorer. If a file within the archive has the same name as a

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The full Photoshop CC is coming to the iPad in 2019


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Adobe is bringing Photoshop CC to the iPad. Set for release next year, Photoshop CC for iPad will bring the full Photoshop engine to Apple’s line of tablets.

Photoshop for iPad has a user interface structured similarly to the desktop application. It is immediately familiar to users of the application but tuned for touch screens, with larger targets and adaptations for the tablet as well as gestures to streamline workflows. Both touch and pencil input are supported. The interface is somewhat simpler than the desktop version, and although the same Photoshop code is running under the hood to ensure there’s no loss of fidelity, not every feature will be available in the mobile version. The first release will contain the main tools while Adobe plans to add more in the future.

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Google backtracks—a bit—on controversial Chrome sign-in feature


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Article intro image

Enlarge (credit: Google Chrome)

Google will partially revert a controversial change made in Chrome 69 that unified signing in to Google’s online properties and Chrome itself and which further preserved Google’s cookies even when users chose to clear all cookies. Chrome 70, due in mid-October, will retain the unified signing in by default, but it will allow those who want to opt out to do so.

Chrome has long had the ability to sign in with a Google account. Doing this offers a number of useful features; most significantly, signed-in users can enable syncing of their browser data between devices, so tabs open on one machine can be listed and opened on another, passwords saved in the browser can be retrieved online, and so on. This signing in uses a regular Google account, the same as would be used to sign in to Gmail or the Google search engine.

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Apple iOS 12 review: Less mess


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The wait is over: After a splashy announcement at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference in June, iOS 12 is finally ready. And the best part? While it’s far from the flashiest iPhone update ever — there’s no visual overhaul here or many hyped-up new features — iOS 12 might be the most pleasant Apple software update I’ve ever used.

Yes, “pleasant” — not “feature-packed.” As reported many, many times even before the announcement, Apple’s developers focused on sanding down the software’s rougher edges and making iOS as a whole faster and easier to use. That was no small feat, especially when you consider the number of issues that wound up plaguing last year’s big software release. For once, Apple crafted a software update that feels just as valuable on old hardware as it does on the shiny new stuff.

Apple’s iOS App Store changed the way we think about software


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Ten years ago today, Apple officially launched the iOS App Store and — for better or worse — it helped rewrite the rules of society. The iPhone, which debuted about a year prior, came with just north of 12 built-in apps to start. But with the coming of iOS 2.0 and the App Store, the sort of functionality you could squeeze out of Apple’s smartphone was only constrained by a developer’s imagination … and how much storage you had left.

Microsoft pulls Windows Sets “tabbed windows” feature from next release


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Windows Sets.

First previewed last November, Sets, a new Windows interface feature that will make every window into a tabbed windows, has been removed from the latest Insider Preview build of Windows 10. Moreover, the Verge is reporting that the feature won’t be coming back in this year’s next major update, due in October.

This marks the second time that Sets have been included in a preview release, only to be removed at a later stage prior to the release of an update. When first announcing Sets, Microsoft was very careful to note that it wasn’t promising Sets for any particular release—or possibly even ever, given the complexities of application compatibility and uncertainty about how people will actually use the feature.

The promise of Sets is certainly high. Putting tabs in every window is a way of solving certain long-standing requests such as the demand for tabs in Explorer

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ACLU urges devs to safeguard users with anti-snooping measures


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Apple recently announced that it was closing the loophole that allows authorities into iPhones via the charging and data port. The company said it wasn’t trying to defy police, but rather deter criminals and spies who aren’t bound by privacy laws. However, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) believes that government requests for personal data still represents a significant security risk to users, and is launching a guide for software developers to help them make more informed decisions about protecting the integrity of software update channels.

macOS Mojave’s dark mode makes late-night computing less painful


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The leaks were on the ball: macOS Mojave will include a dark mode. While the existing operating system already lets you darken the menu bar and dock, Mojave will extend that to the entire interface, whether it’s Finder windows or apps like iTunes. A dynamic desktop can gradually shift your background, too, so you won’t have to remember to change the appearance when the sun sets. Apple pitches this feature as helpful for pro media editors looking to minimize distractions, but it’s also handy for virtually anyone who uses their Mac late at night.

Source: Apple

macOS leak hints at dark mode and desktop News app


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Apple has inadvertently spoiled some of WWDC 2018’s mysteries in advance. Well-known developer Steve Troughton-Smith has spotted a hidden video on the Mac App Store showing off what looks like a new version of macOS with a system-wide dark mode — not just the menu bar and dock as you see today. There’s no guarantee this would translate to iOS, but it would be helpful for both late-night computing sessions and media creators who find bright graphics distracting. This wouldn’t be the only addition, either.

Source: Steve Troughton-Smith (Twitter)

What to expect at WWDC 2018


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It’s officially June now, which means it’s time for us to pack our bags, get on a plane to California and take in the second major developer conference of the season: Apple’s WWDC. We’ll be on the ground at San Jose’s McEnery Convention Center next week scrounging up insights from as many presentations and developer sessions as we can crash. But as always, the show’s focal point is the Monday keynote where Apple lays out its future in software. Be sure to keep your browser locked on our liveblog when the keynote begins on Monday, June 4 at 10AM PT/1PM ET — until then, read on for a primer on all the things we expect see once the keynote unfolds.

YouTube Music will replace Google Play Music but won’t kill user uploads


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Google has confirmed that its revamped YouTube Music streaming service will eventually support key features of its Google Play Music app, including the ability for users to upload music files that may not exist in the service’s streaming catalog.

Google announced an overhaul for YouTube Music last week alongside a price bump for its YouTube Red service. It then began a “soft” rollout of the app for select users on Tuesday.

But the announcement of a revamped YouTube Music app has caused some confusion among those who subscribe to Google Play Music, a streaming music service Google launched in 2011 but has struggled to attract subscribers on the level of category leaders Spotify and Apple Music.

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