Stadia’s E3 Doom Eternal demo made me a cloud gaming believer


This post is by Kyle Orland from Ars Technica


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LOS ANGELES—Since Google’s Project Stream beta test in October and the company’s March announcement of the full Stadia platform, one question has loomed large over the service: will it actually work well enough for fast-paced, reflex-intensive games? After playing a demo of Doom Eternal for about half an hour Wednesday, I’m ready to say that the answer to that question seems to be yes—at least in Google’s controlled testing conditions.

Google invited me out to its downtown LA YouTube Gaming creator’s space—away from the Internet-congested E3 show floor—to try out the latest build of Stadia. My demo was running locally on a Pixelbook with the Chrome browser, connected to a TV via HDMI, and remotely to data centers more

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Google Confirms Pixel 4 Will Feature Square-Shaped Camera Bump


This post is by Juli Clover from MacRumors: Mac News and Rumors - Front Page


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Google today confirmed that its upcoming Pixel 4 devices will feature a square-shaped rear camera bump, a feature also rumored to be coming to the 2019 iPhones.

A case maker’s mockup for the Pixel 4 smartphones leaked earlier this week, and today, Google confirmed the news itself in a tweeted image showing off the new design.



Google’s rear camera setup appears to include two lenses, a microphone, a flash, and a “spectral sensor” at the top that accounts for things like light flicker when filming an LCD display.

Apple too is planning to use a square-shaped camera bump for its 2019 devices, based on leaked rumors, renders, and cases. Just this week we checked out some cases designed for

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Google Confirms Pixel 4 Will Feature Square-Shaped Camera Bump


This post is by Juli Clover from MacRumors: Mac News and Rumors - Front Page


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Google today confirmed that its upcoming Pixel 4 devices will feature a square-shaped rear camera bump, a feature also rumored to be coming to the 2019 iPhones.

A case maker’s mockup for the Pixel 4 smartphones leaked earlier this week, and today, Google confirmed the news itself in a tweeted image showing off the new design.



Google’s rear camera setup appears to include two lenses, a microphone, a flash, and a “spectral sensor” at the top that accounts for things like light flicker when filming an LCD display.

Apple too is planning to use a square-shaped camera bump for its 2019 devices, based on leaked rumors, renders, and cases. Just this week we checked out some cases designed for

Continue reading “Google Confirms Pixel 4 Will Feature Square-Shaped Camera Bump”

I’ll be passing on Google’s new 2fa for logins on iPhones and iPads. Here’s why


This post is by Dan Goodin from Ars Technica


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I’ll be passing on Google’s new 2fa for logins on iPhones and iPads. Here’s why

Enlarge (credit: Google)

Google is expanding its new Android-based two-factor authentication (2fa) to people logging in to Google and Google Cloud services on iPhones and iPads. While Google deserves props for trying to make stronger authentication available to more users, I’ll be avoiding it in favor of 2fa methods Google has had in place for years. I’ll explain why later. First, here’s some background.

Google first announced Android’s built-in security key in April, when it went into beta, and again in May, when it became generally available. The idea is to make devices running Android 7 and up users’ primary 2fa device. When someone enters a valid password into a Google account, the phone displays a message alerting the account owner. Users then tap a “yes” button if the login is legitimate. If it’s an unauthorized attempt, the user can block the login from going through.

The system aims

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Tariffs are forcing Big Tech to move production out of China


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In response to the Trump administration’s trade war with China, major tech companies are preparing to relocate key manufacturing operations. According to Bloomberg, Google is moving production of its US-bound Nest thermostats and motherboards to Taiwan. The Wall Street Journal reports that Nintendo is shifting at least some production of its Switch console to Southeast Asia. At the same time, China has allegedly warned companies that they will face permanent consequences if they cooperate with Trump administration trade restrictions.

Source: Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal

Shazam can now ID tracks played through your headphones


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Apple’s music ID app Shazam has always been a handy tool to have on your phone, but it has one small inconvenience – it can only identify music which is either played through your device’s internal speakers or picked up by its microphone.

Via: The Verge

Source: Google Play, Shazam

G20 countries agree to close tax loopholes for tech companies


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Tech giants are already finding themselves on the hook for more taxes in parts of Europe, but there could now be a much more coordinated effort to have them pay up. Reuters says it has obtained a Group of 20 draft communiqué revealing an agreement to establish “common rules” for closing tax loopholes used by companies like Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. While the specifics haven’t been nailed down, it would involve a “two-pillar” approach that both divides the rights to tax companies where products are sold (not just where they have offices) and a minimum tax rate.

Source: Reuters

Google confirms 2017 supply-chain attack that sneaked backdoor on Android devices


This post is by Dan Goodin from Ars Technica


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Man wearing T-shirt that reads

(credit: Alexandre Dulaunoy / Flickr)

Criminals in 2017 managed to get an advanced backdoor preinstalled on Android devices before they left the factories of manufacturers, Google researchers confirmed on Thursday.

Triada first came to light in 2016 in articles published by Kaspersky here and here, the first of which said the malware was “one of the most advanced mobile Trojans” the security firm’s analysts had ever encountered. Once installed, Triada’s chief purpose was to install apps that could be used to send spam and display ads. It employed an impressive kit of tools, including rooting exploits that bypassed security protections built into Android and the means to modify the Android OS’s all-powerful Zygote process. That meant the malware could directly tamper with every installed app. Triada also connected to no fewer than 17 command and control servers.

In July 2017, security firm Dr. Web reported that its researchers

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Despite “revolutionary” promises, Stadia’s biz model is pure establishment


This post is by Kyle Orland from Ars Technica


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"Play Now"... but first, do you want to pay full price to buy the full version of the game?

Enlarge / “Play Now”… but first, do you want to pay full price to buy the full version of the game?

In announcing Stadia this March, Google executives sold their streamed-gaming ambitions as a way to revolutionize the gaming business and the community surrounding it. With today’s announcement of Stadia’s pricing and business model, though, the company seems to be stuck in a decidedly old-fashioned mode that doesn’t really exploit streaming’s biggest benefits.

It starts with the initial hardware purchase requirements. A big part of Google’s sales pitch for Stadia was the fact that the service would work on any computer with a Web browser, as well as generic mobile phones and tablets, using non-proprietary USB controllers. Requiring early adopters to purchase $129 worth of Chromecast Ultra and Stadia Controller hardware cuts against that “open to anyone” messaging. In a world where an Xbox One with a bundled

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Google Stadia requires $130 upfront, $10 per month at November launch


This post is by Kyle Orland from Ars Technica


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Players will have to pay $129.99 up front and $9.99 a month, on top of individual game purchase costs, when Google’s previously announced Stadia game-streaming service launches in November. A free tier will be available some time in 2020, as will a paid subscription tier that doesn’t require the upfront purchase.

The Stadia Founder’s Edition and its contingent Stadia Pro subscription will be the only way to get access to the Stadia service when it launches, Google announced today. That $129.99 package, available for pre-order on the Google Store right now, will include:

  • A Stadia controller in “limited-edition night blue”
  • A Chromecast Ultra
  • Three months of Stadia Pro service and a three-month “buddy pass” to give to a friend
  • First dibs on claiming a “Stadia Name”

After the first three months, Stadia Pro users

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This week’s dead Google product is Google Trips, may it rest in peace


This post is by Ron Amadeo from Ars Technica


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Google’s wild ride of service shutdowns never stops. Next up on the chopping block is Google Trips, a trip organization app that is popular with frequent travelers. Recently Google started notifying users of the pending shutdown directly in the Trips app; a splash screen now pops up before the app starts, saying “We’re saying goodbye to Google Trips Aug 5,” along with a link to a now all-to-familiar Google shutdown support document.

Trips

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Congressional hearings signal growing antitrust problems for big tech


This post is by Timothy B. Lee from Ars Technica


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The European Commission is investigating potentially false claims that Facebook cannot merge user information from the messaging network WhatsApp, which it acquired in 2014. Warsaw, Poland, on December 21, 2016. (Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Enlarge / The European Commission is investigating potentially false claims that Facebook cannot merge user information from the messaging network WhatsApp, which it acquired in 2014. Warsaw, Poland, on December 21, 2016. (Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images) (credit: NurPhoto | Getty Images)

The House Antitrust Subcommittee will conduct a series of hearings on the growing power of big technology companies, Chairman David Cicilline (D-R.I.) announced on Monday. It’s the latest sign of growing interest in antitrust action against the largest technology companies—especially Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Apple.

“After four decades of weak antitrust enforcement and judicial hostility to antitrust cases, it is critical that Congress step in to determine whether existing laws are adequate to tackle abusive conduct by platform gatekeepers or whether we need new legislation to respond to this challenge,” Cicilline said in a press release.

The announcement came shortly after news about a deal

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Facebook, Google stocks fall on imminent antitrust probes


This post is by Timothy B. Lee from Ars Technica


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Facebook, Google stocks fall on imminent antitrust probes

The stock market has reacted badly to reports in The Wall Street Journal that two of the nation’s largest technology companies—Facebook and Google—are likely to face intensifying antitrust scrutiny from federal regulators in the United States.

As I write this on Monday afternoon, Facebook stock is down 7 percent, while Google stock is down 6.5 percent. The S&P 500 index of large stocks is down less than 1 percent.

An unusual legal arrangement gives the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission joint responsibility for antitrust enforcement. The two agencies negotiate to decide which one will represent the government in any particular inquiry.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Lenovo Smart Clock review: A small smart display that doesn’t display much


This post is by Valentina Palladino from Ars Technica


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Lenovo Smart Clock review: A small smart display that doesn’t display much

Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino)

Google, Amazon, Facebook, and the like want to convince you that you need a smart display. But as we’ve explored in previous reviews, most smart displays are luxury versions of their screen-less counterparts. Everything that you can do with an Amazon Echo or a Google Home can be done with a comparable smart display, but the latter can show you visual information and (in some cases) videos. If you don’t care much for visual information in such a device, why spring for a smart display? These devices are hard sells, particularly because most cost $150 or more.

That’s not the case with Lenovo’s new Smart Clock. It’s the first Google-Assistant answer to Amazon’s Echo Spot, serving as a tiny smart screen that shows the time by default and can be used to set alarms and do everything a regular Google Home device does. It could be

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Finally, I can use my iPhone to ride the NYC subway


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This morning, as I’ve done regularly since moving to New York City years ago, I left my Brooklyn apartment to head to Engadget headquarters in Manhattan. In an ideal world, I would’ve been able to use my iPhone to get through the turnstile at my nearby subway station. But, even though the MTA is now supporting contactless payments services such as Apple Pay, only a handful of stations and buses have so far been upgraded to the new One Metro New York (OMNY) system. The one close to my apartment isn’t one of them. Still, I wanted to get the full experience beyond a quick demo from Apple. Thankfully, there’s a subway station near our office that has the tap-to-pay turnstiles.

Apple, Google and others condemn UK plan to view encrypted chats


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Major players within the tech industry have long-opposed the idea of government access to users’ messages and chat conversations — now they’re continuing the fight with an open letter to GCHQ (the UK’s government communication headquarters) lambasting proposals that could allow officials to eavesdrop on encrypted chats.

Via: The Guardian

Source: LawFare Blog, Open letter

Craig Federighi Responds to Google’s Subtle ‘Luxury Good’ Dig About Apple Products and Privacy


This post is by Joe Rossignol from MacRumors: Mac News and Rumors - Front Page


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In a recent op-ed for The New York Times, Google CEO Sundar Pichai said that “privacy cannot be a luxury good offered only to people who can afford to buy premium products and services,” a comment that some viewed as a dig at Apple.

Craig Federighi at WWDC 2018


Apple’s software engineering chief Craig Federighi has unsurprisingly disagreed with that position in an interview with The Independent, noting that Apple aspires to offer great product experiences that “everyone should have,” while cautioning that the values and business models of other companies “don’t change overnight.”

“I don’t buy into the luxury good dig,” says Federighi, giving the impression he was genuinely surprised by the public attack.

“On the one hand gratifying that other companies in space over the last few months, seemed to be making a lot of positive noises about caring about privacy. I think it’s a

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Fake cryptocurrency apps on Google Play try to profit on bitcoin price surge


This post is by Dan Goodin from Ars Technica


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Fake cryptocurrency apps on Google Play try to profit on bitcoin price surge

Enlarge (credit: Google)

Google’s official Play Store has been caught hosting malicious apps that targeted Android users with an interest in cryptocurrencies, researchers reported on Thursday.

In all, researchers with security provider ESET recently discovered two fraudulent digital wallets. The first, called Coin Wallet, let users create wallets for a host of different cryptocurrencies. While Coin Wallet purported to generate a unique wallet address for users to deposit coins, the app in fact used a developer-owned wallet for each supported currency, with a total of 13 wallets. Each Coin Wallet user was assigned the same wallet address for a specific currency.

“The app claims it lets users create wallets for various cryptocurrencies,” ESET Malware Researcher Lukas Stefanko wrote in a blog post. “However, its actual purpose is to trick users into transferring cryptocurrency into the attackers’ wallets—a classic case of what we named wallet address scams in our previous

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