Apple’s new Logic Pro X is built for the Mac Pro


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Apple boasted that the redesigned Mac Pro could easily handle the most demanding audio editing tasks, and now the software is ready for it. The tech firm has updated its Logic Pro X music editing app to support the new workstation’s many cores, handling up to a whopping 56 processing threads. That lets the Mac Pro juggle up to 1,000 audio and software instrument tracks, or four times as many as the old computer. You won’t be hurting for power if you’re composing an elaborate orchestral piece for the latest Hollywood blockbuster.

Source: Apple Newsroom

Tariffs are forcing Big Tech to move production out of China


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In response to the Trump administration’s trade war with China, major tech companies are preparing to relocate key manufacturing operations. According to Bloomberg, Google is moving production of its US-bound Nest thermostats and motherboards to Taiwan. The Wall Street Journal reports that Nintendo is shifting at least some production of its Switch console to Southeast Asia. At the same time, China has allegedly warned companies that they will face permanent consequences if they cooperate with Trump administration trade restrictions.

Source: Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal

Apple and Microsoft made a new iCloud for Windows app


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Apple and Microsoft teamed up to create an iCloud Drive experience that will hopefully resolve some compatibility issues. A brand new iCloud for Windows app is available today in the Microsoft Store for Windows 10 users. The iCloud app will use the same technology as Microsoft’s OneDrive’s On-Demand feature — a very rare collaboration from tech’s two biggest rivals. Users can now easily access photos, videos, mail, calendars, files and other information from their iCloud accounts from their PC or smartphone.

Source: Microsoft

Apple can make US-bound iPhones outside of China if necessary


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If the trade war between the US and China spirals out of control and leads to Chinese retaliation against American tech production, is Apple hosed? Not necessarily. Senior Foxconn exec Young Liu told investors that his manufacturing company has “enough capacity” to make US-bound iPhones outside of China if necessary. About a quarter of that capacity is elsewhere, Liu said, including growing Indian production. While Apple hasn’t made any moves on that front, Foxconn can shift its lines elsewhere if things go south.

Source: Bloomberg

Ubisoft teases an Apple TV+ series called ‘Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet’


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Ubisoft is working on a live-action series called Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet, the company has announced at E3 2019. The new show, which stars Rob McElhenney (It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia) and Danny Pudi (Community), is said to be coming to Apple TV+, the streaming service that’s expected to launch later this fall. There aren’t many details about the series right now, but we do know it was produced and created by McElhenney along with two other It’s Always Sunny veterans, Charlie Day and Megan Ganz.

Apple may have narrowed down the Mac Pro’s release date


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The Mac Pro was one of the bigger announcements at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference last week, bringing with it immense power and an aesthetically questionable if practical design (it looks like a cheese grater instead of a trash can this time). Apple said it would release the machine in the fall, but it may have accidentally revealed the release month before it intended to.

Via: 9to5 Mac

G20 countries agree to close tax loopholes for tech companies


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Tech giants are already finding themselves on the hook for more taxes in parts of Europe, but there could now be a much more coordinated effort to have them pay up. Reuters says it has obtained a Group of 20 draft communiqué revealing an agreement to establish “common rules” for closing tax loopholes used by companies like Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. While the specifics haven’t been nailed down, it would involve a “two-pillar” approach that both divides the rights to tax companies where products are sold (not just where they have offices) and a minimum tax rate.

Source: Reuters

iOS 13 will show locations where apps have tracked you


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Apple will be big on privacy in iOS 13, and that includes the data collected after you’ve granted permission. Beta testers at 9to5Mac and elsewhere have discovered the upcoming release (and iPadOS) will occasionally pop up detailed panels asking if you want to retain the level of location sharing you have for a given app, including a map of just where an app has been tracking you. There’s also a description of just why an app needs that tracking data. If you’re uncomfortable with either explanation, you can limit location gathering on the spot.

Source: 9to5Mac

Is the latest Apple Mac Mini a worthy challenger?


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When Engadget video producer Chris Schodt reviewed the new Mac Mini back in November, it had been four years since the previous model was released. The 2018 upgrade includes an eighth-generation Intel processor and a plethora of ports in a space gray recycled aluminum body, all of which make for a polished and flexible machine. However, Chris thought the lack of a dedicated GPU was a big miss here, particularly for the sort of pro users Apple was trying to court.

Apple is reportedly buying self-driving startup Drive.ai


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Apple is reportedly in the midst of acquiring Drive.ai, the cash-strapped self-driving startup that’s pilot testing its autonomous shuttles in Texas. According to The Information, Cupertino is buying the firm in an effort to boost its self-driving development efforts and absorbing its engineering talent. Based on previous reports, Drive.ai has been looking for a buyer and has been asking bigger rivals if they’re interested since at least March.

Source: The Information

Apple explains the future of iTunes on macOS Catalina


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At WWDC, Apple announced that its upcoming macOS will put an end to the iTunes you’re familiar with and will divvy up its features between three new apps: Music, TV and podcasts. Now, the tech giant has explained how that will work exactly. The new Apple Music app will serve as home to all the music you’ve imported or purchased, to all the music and smart playlists you’ve created in iTunes, as well as to the iTunes Store itself.

Via: 9to5mac

Source: Apple

Siri will play third-party audio apps in iOS 13


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In the future, you might be able to ask Siri to play your Spotify music and podcasts. According to MacRumors, iOS 13 and iPadOS will open the SiriKit framework to third-party music, podcast, audiobook and radio apps. So, when it comes to playing DJ, Siri will be able to control more than your Apple Music, Podcast and TV apps — formerly known as iTunes, RIP.

Source: MacRumors

Apple might wave goodbye to Dashboard in macOS Catalina


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One of the Mac’s longer-serving features appears to be going away. Appleosophy and others using the developer preview of macOS Catalina have discovered that Dashboard, the secondary screen for widgets, isn’t present. The app is missing in Launchpad, and you can’t even force it to appear using Terminal. We wouldn’t completely rule out a return in a later beta, but iTunes also has a missing icon and is clearly falling out of favor.

Via: MacRumors

Source: Appleosophy

macOS Catalina first look: Sidecar, Project Catalyst and Voice Control


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After Apple wrapped its WWDC keynote today, the developers went to coding sessions and the press, well, mostly showed themselves out. As it happens, we later had a chance to see most of the new software in action in private demos. First, an important caveat: These demos were guided and hands-off, meaning we haven’t yet had a chance to install the software on our own devices and use it as our daily driver. But, until these platforms launch in beta this summer, it’s helpful to have had a chance to see these OSes in use, outside of what turned out to be a packed, fast-moving keynote. When Apple is demoing software on stage, you can easily blink and miss a mention of a new feature, or totally miss how it actually works.

In the video above, we take a look at macOS Catalina and three of its more notable features: Continue reading “macOS Catalina first look: Sidecar, Project Catalyst and Voice Control”

iPadOS first look: Desktop-class browsing, better multitasking and more


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We knew Apple would make major changes to iOS on the iPad, but we didn’t think the company would take things a step further and announce iPadOS. (Not until Apple quietly let the news slip ahead of its WWDC keynote, anyway.) Craig Federighi, Apple’s SVP of software engineering, says the process of using the iPad has become a “truly distinct” experience, one that requires special attention beyond that which goes into phone-centric versions of iOS. Needless to say, iPads stand to gain a lot when this new software becomes available later this year.

A $999 monitor stand is everything wrong with Apple today


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You can pinpoint the exact moment when Apple lost the WWDC audience on Monday. John Ternus, the company’s VP of hardware engineering, had just revealed that the Pro Display XDR, its new high-end 6K monitor, will cost $4,999. That’s pricey, but reasonable considering all of the features it offers. But then there was one more thing, and not the good kind. One hour, forty two minutes and five seconds into the keynote stream, he revealed that the Pro Display’s stand is a separate $999 purchase. The crowd, which was mostly enthusiastic until then, erupted into cautious murmurs — enough to make Ternus stammer as he continued on. He was completely unprepared for the Apple faithful to question the glorious technology being bestowed upon them.

iPadOS won’t change your mind on the iPad


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Apple’s announcement of iPadOS yesterday wasn’t a huge surprise, outside of the name. Rumors have suggested that iOS 13 would be a major step forward for the iPad, bringing multitasking improvements that would make using an iPad more like a “real computer.” It’s something the iPad definitely needs, particularly the $800-plus iPad Pro. If you’re shelling out that kind of cash, it should be capable enough to be your main computer.

The laundry list of improvements coming to the iPad this fall will undoubtedly make Apple’s tablets more capable than ever before. But let’s be clear: if you found the iPad and iOS too limiting before, these updates will likely not change your mind. At first glance, iPadOS seems like a major refinement to the existing iPad user experience — but if you prefer using Windows or macOS, an iPad still might be more of a frustration than a Continue reading “iPadOS won’t change your mind on the iPad”

iOS 13 first look: Dark mode, Maps and more


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A dark mode. A swipe-friendly keyboard. A slew of redesigned apps. These are just a few of the things you’ll find in Apple’s new iOS 13 release, but here’s the rub: unless you’re a developer, you can’t actually try any of these new features until they become available in a public beta later this summer. (And even then, most of you will probably want to wait until iOS 13’s official release this September.)

iOS 13 beta mentions Apple’s Tile-like tracking device


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It appears Apple left one item out of its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) yesterday: its Tile-like tracking device. Earlier this spring, we learned that Apple is supposedly working on a tracking tag, but the company didn’t mention it amidst news of its updated operating systems, Mac Pro and HomeKit security improvements. However, in the iOS 13 beta, developers spotted an asset package for a device with the product type “Tag1,1.” As 9to5Mac reports, that type of asset package is used for pairing devices by proximity — like AirPods and HomePod. It’s more evidence to support rumors that Apple is working on a tracking device.

Source: 9to5Mac