The best note-taking app for iPad just got updated


This post is by Jonny Evans from Apple Must


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Nebo working on an iPad

Nebo working on an iPad

Nebo is one of my favorite productivity-boosting iPad apps and the developers have bought a whole set of additional useful features to the software in the latest v.2.2 update, which is available now – and I have a few copies to give away.

An essential iPad app

Developed by MyScript, this brilliant app lets you take handwritten notes (including smart flowcharts) using your Apple Pencil or Logitech Crayon and iPad.

It can then convert these handwritten ideas into typed items using its hugely accurate (and award-winning) built-in optical character recognition (OCR) software. Nebo’s charm is that it lets you write real handwritten notes that the app’s built-in OCR is smart enough to turn into typed words.

The best way to take notes

The Nebo insider program

This is a great feature, but until now it has not been so easy to switch from Apple Pencil to keyboard, this

Make diagrams
Apple iPad Pro (11-inch, Wi-Fi, 64GB) - Silver (Latest Model)

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Spanish soccer league’s app caught eavesdropping on users in anti-piracy push


This post is by Timothy B. Lee from Ars Technica


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Soccer fans in Madrid on June 12, 2019.

Enlarge / Soccer fans in Madrid on June 12, 2019. (credit: PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU/AFP/Getty Images)

La Liga, Spain’s top professional soccer league, has been slapped with a €250,000 ($280,000) fine for violating user privacy after the league’s official app activated the microphones on user cell phones, El País reports. The app spied on users in an effort to identify bars that were showing pirated streams of soccer games.

Spanish users download the app to get game times, scores, and other information about soccer games. But the app also included a function designed to help the league identify venues that were streaming soccer games without paying the appropriate licensing fees.

The app would use the GPS sensor to determine whether the phone was located in a bar or other venue that might show soccer streams. If it was, the app would listen for audio from a copyrighted game. If a bar was

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Siri will play third-party audio apps in iOS 13


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In the future, you might be able to ask Siri to play your Spotify music and podcasts. According to MacRumors, iOS 13 and iPadOS will open the SiriKit framework to third-party music, podcast, audiobook and radio apps. So, when it comes to playing DJ, Siri will be able to control more than your Apple Music, Podcast and TV apps — formerly known as iTunes, RIP.

Source: MacRumors

iTunes isn’t dead


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I’ll admit it. I had an emotional response to the idea that iTunes, the app that shaped my digital music habit, could be on the way out. With every iPod I owned, iTunes was the lifeline, the sole method for adding to and organizing the precious collection. The only problem was, somewhere along the way, iTunes became the catch-all for everything Apple sold. It wasn’t just for music, or even audio content — apps, movies and TV shows crept into the app as well. And in the end, Apple had a chaotic mess that was confusing and poorly organized.

‘Sign in with Apple’ protects your email and info from apps


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Apple has long touted its approach to privacy as a selling point, and at WWDC, it revealed more privacy-oriented features. It’s offering a “Sign in with Apple” option for apps and services it says provides “fast, easy sign in without the tracking” that other login options such as Facebook and Google use.

Recommended Reading: Blame the apps for iPhone privacy woes


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iPhone privacy is broken… and apps are to blame
Joanna Stern,
The Wall Street Journal

Thanks in part to Facebook’s privacy blunders, concern over personal data security is growing. And we continue to find things gobbling up our info that we didn’t know were doing so. The Wall Street Journal tested 80 iOS apps and discovered that a lot of them are tracking users in ways we aren’t aware of. It’s a topic that could be a focus during Monday’s WWDC keynote.

Apple raises iOS cellular download limit to 200MB


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Believe it or not, Apple has kept iOS’ cellular download limit to 150MB per app since September 2017 — and that’s a problem when many apps can be larger. The company is changing with the times, though, and has quietly upped the cap to 200MB. And that’s being modest. This should let you download larger apps in practice (9to5Mac believes the ‘real’ app size is around 240MB) due to compression and the omissions of assets your device doesn’t need.

Source: 9to5Mac

Apple will reportedly limit third-party tracking in kids apps


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As tech companies grapple with safety and privacy concerns, Apple will reportedly limit third-party tracking in kids apps starting next week. While the company hasn’t announced the change, a source told The Wall Street Journal that it’s in the works. Given that Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is Monday — and that Facebook and Google have used their respective developer conferences to tout privacy initiatives — it wouldn’t be surprising for Apple to announce increased privacy for kids.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

Tips for Travelers 2019: Apps You Should Install Before Departure


This post is by Steve Sande from Other World Computing Blog


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Current Location: Skagway, Alaska

The Memorial Day weekend is just behind us, and a summer of fun travel adventures is ahead. Three years ago, the Rocket Yard featured a series of tips for those embarking on adventures, and starting today I’ll bring an updated set of ideas to help ease your days away from home.

In the first installment of this series, I’ll provide a list of apps you might want to pick up from the iOS or Mac App Stores before you pack your bags and lock the door…

Southwest Airlines aircraft in Charleston, SC. Photo by Steven Sande

Southwest Airlines aircraft in Charleston, SC. Photo by Steven Sande

Transportation-Related Apps

When you’re heading somewhere — whether halfway around the world or just a few hours away from your home — there are a number of apps that can help to make your travels safer, less stressful, and more convenient.

At the top level are those apps created by

Map apps are a necessity for finding your way to local businesses and attractions
Games or books can keep you or the kids occupied during downtime

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Mac security hole reportedly lets attackers bypass app safeguards


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Apple may have another Gatekeeper security flaw on its hands. Researcher Filippo Cavallarin has detailed a macOS vulnerability that he said would let attackers install malware without the usual permission request. As Gatekeeper considers network shares to be ‘safe’ locations that don’t require permission checks, an intruder just has to trick the user into mounting one of those shares to run the apps they like. A maliciously crafted ZIP file with the right symbolic link could automatically steer you to an attacker-owned site, for example, and it would be easy to trick someone into launching a hostile app — say, a virus masquerading as a document folder.

Via: 9to5Mac

Source: Filippo Cavallarin

Apple: The App Store isn’t a monopoly ‘by any metric’


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This morning, the Supreme Court decided to allow iPhone owners to proceed with a lawsuit against Apple. The plaintiffs claim that Apple has a monopoly through the App Store. Apple tried to argue that developers are the ones who pay Apple’s commission, so they would need to file a lawsuit on the issue. But the Supreme Court has ruled that the case may continue as is. In a statement, released to CNBC this afternoon, Apple says it is confident it will prevail when the facts are presented.

Source: CNBC, 9to5mac

Apple accused of clamping down on apps competing with Screen Time


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The introduction of Screen Time in iOS 12 was ostensibly a boon for parents and anyone else wanting to keep a lid on device use, but there are concerns that it’s cracking down on apps that compete with that feature. The New York Times and Sensor Tower have learned that Apple has either pulled or requested feature limitations for “at least” 11 of the 17 most popular parental control and screen time apps, and leaders at those developers claim it’s trying to discourage apps that rival Screen Time’s functionality. The creators of two apps, Kidslox and Qustodio, filed an EU competition complaint on April 25th.

Source: New York Times

Apple opens in-app subscription discounts to existing users


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In a ploy to keep people paying for apps, Apple will let developers offer discounted subscriptions to current and recent subscribers. Until now, developers could only offer freebies and introductory discounts to new users, which means that they couldn’t easily incentivize lapsed subscribers to re-join. As more apps turn to subscription models over one-time purchases, this change will likely go over well with developers and users alike.

Via: MacRumors

Source: Apple

Porn and gambling apps are also abusing Apple’s enterprise certificates


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Following the controversy over Facebook and Google‘s misuse of enterprise certificates to distribute apps outside of Apple’s App Store, TechCrunch reports that dozens of gambling and pornographic apps used the same process to sidestep Apple’s normal restrictions. Engadget reached out to Apple for comment regarding the report and will update this story if we hear back.

Source: TechCrunch

Apple is cracking down on apps that secretly record your screen


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A recent report by TechCrunch and The App Analyst revealed that some major companies use an analytics tool that secretly record every swipe and tap you make within their applications. Now, Apple has started telling developers to remove that screen-recording code if they don’t want their apps yanked from the App Store. See, most of the applications that use the tool don’t ask for permission to record your activities and your screen. That goes against the tech giant’s App Store Review Guidelines, which (as a spokesperson explained to TechCrunch) “require that apps request explicit user consent and provide a clear visual indication when recording, logging, or otherwise making a record of user activity.”

Source: TechCrunch

Did you know these iPhone apps record your screen while you use them?


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When an app says it’s collecting data for technical support or analytics purposes, it seems innocuous but a report by TechCrunch and The App Analyst found a number of iOS applications that went much further without informing users. The apps mentioned, including Air Canada, Abercrombie & Fitch, Expedia, Hotels.com and others used analytics software from a company called Glassbox that embeds “session replay” tech to show them exactly what users are doing.

Whatever buttons are pushed or information is entered is recorded, and worse, while the feature can be configured to prevent recording of sensitive data like credit card numbers, they didn’t always block it out fully. By using man-in-the-middle software to intercept data going to Glassbox’s servers, The App Analyst showed how this happens in Air Canada’s app, where it could screenshot credit card info and user passwords.

Source: TechCrunch, The App Analyst

Google Play apps with >4.3 million downloads stole pics and pushed porn ads


This post is by Dan Goodin from Ars Technica


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Screenshots of the pop-up ads displayed by malicious apps that were available in Google's Play Store.

Enlarge / Screenshots of the pop-up ads displayed by malicious apps that were available in Google’s Play Store. (credit: Trend Micro)

Google has banned dozens of Android apps downloaded millions of times from the official Play Store after researchers discovered they were being used to display phishing and scam ads or perform other malicious acts.

A blog post published by security firm Trend Micro listed 29 camera- or photo-related apps, with the top 11 of them fetching 100,000 to 1 million downloads each. One crop of apps caused browsers to display full-screen ads when users unlocked their devices. Clicking the pop-up ads in some cases caused a paid online pornography player to be downloaded, although it was incapable of playing content. The apps were carefully designed to conceal their malicious capabilities.

“None of these apps give any indication that they are the ones behind the ads, thus users might find

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Hands-on with the new Gmail for Android (and iOS)


This post is by Ron Amadeo from Ars Technica


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Google is pushing a big redesign to the mobile Gmail app on Android and iOS. The update was announced yesterday, and after spending some time with the new app, we’re going to comb through the finer details and see what has changed between New Gmail and Old Gmail.

For now the release is only out on Android, but like the old Gmail design, it should look identical on iOS. If you’re on Android, you want Gmail version 9.x (the old design is Gmail 8). If the Play Store isn’t serving you the update and you’re into sideloading, APKMirror has a safe download. The iOS version is still wending its way through the App Store approval process and should be out sometime this week.

The new design is a good match for the new desktop Gmail design that came

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Apple’s new rules can make gifts out of in-app purchases


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It looks like Apple will soon allow users to gift in-app purchases to friends and family thanks to a recent change to the company’s App Store Guidelines. First spotted by MacRumors, the updated text shows developers can allow people to buy in-app purchases for one another. That includes everything from ongoing subscriptions to one-off boosts. Apple’s policy previously barred such gifts.

Via: 9to5Mac

Source: MacRumors

5 useful iPhone gadgets for dog lovers


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3 great dogs

I’m a dog owner.

When they are young, I get to spend endless hours striding through the great outdoors, then, as they grow older, they need less of that kind of attention and more of other kinds of support.

That’s why I’ve been looking around for iOS-compatible gadgets for dog lovers.

Here are five to get things started.

Furbo Dog Camera and treat providing system

Price, $199

This contraption is actually several gadgets in one. It’s a dog treat dispenser, 1,080p video camera with night vision and a barking sensor, which means it will let you know if your dog starts barking and you can check what’s going on using the accompanying app on your iPhone.

The video camera provides a 160-degree wide angle view, so you should be able to see what your dog is doing – and there’s a speaker in the system, which lets you talk to

Knitting With Dog Hair: Better A Sweater From A Dog You Know and Love Than From A Sheep You'll Never Meet by Kendall Crolius (1997-01-15)

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