Apple Music, App Store, and Mac App Store Suffering Limited Outages Following iOS 13 and macOS Catalina Betas


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Apple Music, the App Store, and the Mac App Store are experiencing outages affecting “some users,” according to Apple’s system status page, one day after Apple seeded the first betas of iOS 13 and macOS Catalina to developers.



Apple says some users are “experiencing a problem” with each service. The company is investigating and will update the statuses of each service as more information becomes available. The issues began around 5 a.m. Pacific Time.

We’ll update this post once the outages are resolved.

(Thanks, Chris!)

This article, "Apple Music, App Store, and Mac App Store Suffering Limited Outages Following iOS 13 and macOS Catalina Betas" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple limits tracking and ads in kid-focused apps


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Apple had an unexpected trick up its sleeve on the privacy front when it unveiled a Sign in with Apple option for apps and services at WWDC. But that’s not the only privacy-focused measure it revealed today. Developers are no longer permitted to include third-party ads or analytics tools (which are ostensibly used for tracking) in apps in the App Store’s kids category.

Via: TechCrunch

Source: Apple

‘Sign in with Apple’ protects your email and info from apps


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Apple has long touted its approach to privacy as a selling point, and at WWDC, it revealed more privacy-oriented features. It’s offering a “Sign in with Apple” option for apps and services it says provides “fast, easy sign in without the tracking” that other login options such as Facebook and Google use.

Apple’s watchOS 6 finally adds an app store


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The Apple Watch is about to become that much more independent from your iPhone. Apple has introduced watchOS 6, and its centerpiece is an on-device App Store — yes, you can download apps to your wrist without having to reach for your handset. There are apps that can exist wholly independently of the iPhone, Apple said. You can also expect a slew of new first-party apps that fill in longstanding gaps in functionality, including Audiobooks, Voice Memos and (at last) a calculator.

European Regulators Awaiting Response From Apple After Spotify Called the App Store a Monopoly


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The European Commission is awaiting a response from Apple after Spotify accused the iPhone maker of anticompetitive business practices in relation to its App Store, said the European Union’s antitrust chief Margrethe Vestager.



“We are looking into that and we have been asking questions around in that market but of course also Apple themselves, for them to answer the allegations. And when they come back, we will know more,” said Vestager, speaking on the sidelines of an economic conference, according to Reuters.

In March, Spotify announced it had filed an antitrust complaint against Apple with the European Commission over unfair App Store practices. Apple responded two days later, labeling the complaint as “misleading rhetoric” and arguing that “Spotify wants all the benefits of a free app without being free.”

In a blog post, Spotify founder and CEO Daniel Ek took particular issue with Apple charging a 30

Continue reading “European Regulators Awaiting Response From Apple After Spotify Called the App Store a Monopoly”

Apple Highlights WWDC 2019 Scholarship Winners and Their Apps


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Each year, Apple provides up to 350 students with a free ticket to WWDC and lodging for the conference. The lucky winners are selected based on the quality of their Swift Playground coding submission and written answers.

Apple has highlighted dozens of WWDC 2019 scholarship winners and their apps in an editorial in the App Store under the Today tab.



This year’s winners hail from over 20 countries and regions around the world, according to Apple, including Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Italy, Kazakhstan, Korea, Norway, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, the U.K., and the U.S.

The winners also had the opportunity to discuss their apps with Apple CEO Tim Cook, Apple marketing executive Greg Joswiak, and vice president of software engineering operations Cheryl Thomas at the McEnery Convention Center on Sunday, according to photos shared by

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Apple raises iOS cellular download limit to 200MB


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Believe it or not, Apple has kept iOS’ cellular download limit to 150MB per app since September 2017 — and that’s a problem when many apps can be larger. The company is changing with the times, though, and has quietly upped the cap to 200MB. And that’s being modest. This should let you download larger apps in practice (9to5Mac believes the ‘real’ app size is around 240MB) due to compression and the omissions of assets your device doesn’t need.

Source: 9to5Mac

Apple will reportedly limit third-party tracking in kids apps


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As tech companies grapple with safety and privacy concerns, Apple will reportedly limit third-party tracking in kids apps starting next week. While the company hasn’t announced the change, a source told The Wall Street Journal that it’s in the works. Given that Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is Monday — and that Facebook and Google have used their respective developer conferences to tout privacy initiatives — it wouldn’t be surprising for Apple to announce increased privacy for kids.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

Apple’s App Store Defense


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App Store IconApple launched an interesting “Principles and Practices” page on their site today that reads like a defense of their oft-seemingly unfair App Store practices. And considering the Supreme Court’s recent ruling that now allows plaintiffs to sue under antitrust laws, it’s hard to not assume Apple is wanting to plead their case in the court of public opinion – perhaps ahead of next week’s WWDC19. As the acronym implies, there may be a few a developers in attendance.

Dedicated to the best store experience for everyone.

That’s the headline. And whether consumers and developers believe this to be true or not, the App Store is still the only place where users are able to download apps for their iOS devices. Apple lays out several reasons as to why the App Store is what it is (exclusive) and operates how it does (exclusively).

Apple Defends App Store Practices in Light of Antitrust Discourse


This post is by Ryan Christoffel from MacStories


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Apple has been in the news at several points this year due to claims that its App Store practices are monopolistic. First, Spotify filed a complaint against Apple with the European Commission, then more recently, the US Supreme Court ruled that an antitrust lawsuit against Apple could proceed, setting the stage for potential future battles in this space.

Today Apple has launched a new page on its website defending its App Store practices and sharing the values that lie at the core of the Store.

It’s our store. And we take responsibility for it.

We believe that what’s in our store says a lot about who we are. We strongly support all points of view being represented on the App Store. But we also take steps to make sure apps are respectful to users with differing opinions, and reject apps for any content or behavior that we believe is over Continue reading “Apple Defends App Store Practices in Light of Antitrust Discourse”

Apple Says App Store ‘Welcomes Competition’ Following Criticism From Spotify and Others


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Apple has faced increasing scrutiny as of late over the way it runs its App Store, ranging from Spotify’s anticompetitive complaint in Europe to a class action lawsuit accusing Apple of operating an App Store monopoly in the United States, which the Supreme Court recently allowed to proceed.



Apple has now responded with a new page on the App Store section of its website titled Principles and Practices, noting that the App Store was created with two goals: to be “a safe and trusted place for customers to discover and download apps” and “a great business opportunity for all developers.”

To achieve the first goal, Apple says it “takes responsibility” for “ensuring that apps are held to a high standard for privacy, security, and content” in accordance with its publicly accessible App Store Review Guidelines:

We believe that what’s in our store says a lot about

Continue reading “Apple Says App Store ‘Welcomes Competition’ Following Criticism From Spotify and Others”

Apple publicly makes its case for the App Store


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Apple has published a lengthy post explaining and extolling the App Store’s guidelines and developer program, following the Supreme Court’s decision in an antitrust case related to its application emporium. On May 13th, the Supreme Court has ruled against the tech giant in a long-standing price-fixing suit, which accuses the company of maintaining a monopoly over iOS app distribution to keep prices high and to be able to take a 30 percent commission.

Source: Apple

Intentional Subscriptions


This post is by Ryan Christoffel from MacStories


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Developer David Smith, writing on his blog about a better way for Apple to handle subscriptions:

There is a concept in user interface design called the Principle of Least Surprise, where you want to design systems in such a way that they surprise their users least. I think a similar concept applies to subscription pricing. The ideal (from a user friendliness perspective, not best business perspective) system for customer subscriptions should never surprise the customer with a charge. The customer should always be happy to see a charge appear on their credit card.

In other words, their subscription payments should always be Intentional.

Apple already offers guidelines for how developers must handle subscription activation pages, as some apps have historically employed misleading labels and buttons designed to maximize signups without putting cost and other key details front and center. Smith offers four suggestions which, if implemented, would go Continue reading “Intentional Subscriptions”

Apps Are Using Background App Refresh to Send Data to Tracking Companies


This post is by Juli Clover from MacRumors: Mac News and Rumors - Front Page


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When Background App Refresh is enabled, some iOS apps are using the feature to regularly send data to tracking companies, according to a privacy experiment from The Washington Post that explores the relationship between apps and tracking companies.

The Washington Post‘s Geoffrey Fowler teamed up with privacy firm Disconnect and used specialized software to see what his iPhone was doing and when. And while it’s no surprise that apps are using trackers and sharing user data, the frequency with which apps took advantage of background refresh to send data off to tracking companies is surprising, as is some of the data shared.



Fowler found that apps were sending data like phone number, email, location, IP address, and more.

On a recent Monday night, a dozen marketing companies, research firms and other personal data guzzlers got reports from my iPhone. At 11:43 p.m., a company called Amplitude learned

Continue reading “Apps Are Using Background App Refresh to Send Data to Tracking Companies”

Valve releases Steam Link app for iPhone, iPad and Apple TV


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PC gaming is ready to meet iOS, now that Valve’s Steam Link app is available for Apple’s devices. You can evne play them on your TV easily via the Apple TV, streamed right from your PC. Apple had blocked its release last year, but evidently that has been worked out — likely because you can’t purchase games with it anymore — and you can grab it from the App Store now.

Valve has also renamed “In-Home Streaming” as simply Remote Play in the latest beta Steam release, so that it’s the same whether you’re using it at home or beta testing it from further away. As long as the connection is good enough, it will work. When Steam Link launched you needed another PC or dedicated hardware, but apps for iOS, Android and even Raspberry Pi are making it much more widely available. It’s not quite cloud-streamed gaming, Continue reading “Valve releases Steam Link app for iPhone, iPad and Apple TV”

Apple Pay can be used for iTunes, App Store and Apple Book purchases


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You can now use Apple Pay to make purchases from iTunes, the App Store and Apple Books. You can also use it for Apple Music and iCloud storage subscriptions. MacRumors spotted the change in a recently updated support document. The added Apple Pay options are coming to users in the US, Canada, Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Russia, Ukraine and the United Arab Emirates, but they might not be available in all of those locations just yet.

Via: MacRumors

Source: Apple

Apple Pay can be used for iTunes, App Store and Apple Book purchases


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You can now use Apple Pay to make purchases from iTunes, the App Store and Apple Books. MacRumors spotted the change in a recently updated support document. The added Apple Pay options are coming to users in the US, Canada, Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Russia, Ukraine and the United Arab Emirates, but they might not be available in all of those locations just yet.

Via: MacRumors

Source: Apple

Apple Pay Now Accepted for iTunes, App Store, Apple Music, and iCloud Purchases in Some Countries


This post is by Joe Rossignol from MacRumors: Mac News and Rumors - Front Page


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Apple Pay is now an accepted payment method for iTunes, App Store, and Apple Books purchases, as well as Apple Music and iCloud storage subscriptions, as reflected in a recently updated Apple support document.



To link any credit or debit cards set up in the Wallet app with your Apple ID account, navigate to Settings > iTunes & App Store. Next, select your Apple ID email and then tap View Apple ID > Manage Payments > Add Payment Method. The cards should be listed under a new “Found in Wallet” section.

This functionality is rolling out as a server-side change in the United States, Canada, Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Russia, Ukraine, and the United Arab Emirates, so it is not available for all users yet.

In the United States, users can also link an Apple Pay Cash card to an Apple ID account.

There are a handful of

Continue reading “Apple Pay Now Accepted for iTunes, App Store, Apple Music, and iCloud Purchases in Some Countries”

Apple: The App Store isn’t a monopoly ‘by any metric’


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This morning, the Supreme Court decided to allow iPhone owners to proceed with a lawsuit against Apple. The plaintiffs claim that Apple has a monopoly through the App Store. Apple tried to argue that developers are the ones who pay Apple’s commission, so they would need to file a lawsuit on the issue. But the Supreme Court has ruled that the case may continue as is. In a statement, released to CNBC this afternoon, Apple says it is confident it will prevail when the facts are presented.

Source: CNBC, 9to5mac

Supreme Court ruling could threaten Apple’s 30 percent app commission


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Supreme Court ruling could threaten Apple’s 30 percent app commission

Enlarge (credit: Chesnot/Getty Images)

A narrowly divided Supreme Court is allowing a group of consumers to move forward with a lawsuit charging that Apple overcharges customers for app store purchases. Apple had asked courts to throw out the lawsuit, arguing that the law only allowed app developers, not customers, to bring such a case.

The lawsuit has been underway since 2011 and is nowhere close to resolution. The stakes are high. Apple iOS platform is notable for completely shutting out alternative means of app distribution. Other major software platforms—including Android, Mac OS, and Windows—offer customers the option to download and install software they acquire from third parties without paying a commission to the platform owner. But ordinary iPhone users—those who are unwilling or unable to jailbreak or use developer tools—have no way to install apps other than through the official App Store.

Plaintiffs in this case argue that Apple’s 30

Continue reading “Supreme Court ruling could threaten Apple’s 30 percent app commission”