Lenovo retakes the top spot in PC shipments

Happy days are here again for Lenovo, though not for most of the PC industry. The Chinese tech firm has reclaimed the top spot for PC shipments in both Gartner and IDC market share estimates for the third quarter of the year, pushing past HP to scoop up roughly 24 percent of the market. The analyst groups chalked up the growth to both the addition of Fujitsu, better business PC sales and a smarter North American strategy. For most others, though, the season was a mixed bag.

Source: Gartner, IDC

Chrome OS may be the 2-in-1 solution we’ve been waiting for

Tech’s biggest companies are all about the 2-in-1. Google’s latest effort is the Pixel Slate — a tablet that becomes a sort-of laptop when you snap on its keyboard folio. This is a formula we’ve seen rise in popularity since the first Surface tablet. Think: the iPad Pro, Samsung’s Galaxy Tab S4, HP’s Envy x2 detachables and more. These devices are doing so well they’re apparently all people want to buy anymore. According to IDC data, 2-in-1 shipments will grow by almost 10 percent this year, while traditional PCs are expected to decline.

iFixit confirms you can still repair your own iMac Pro or MacBook Pro

Yesterday MacRumors and Motherboard reported on Apple service documents that indicated anyone replacing key parts on computers equipped with its custom T2 chip would require special diagnostic software to finish the job. While Apple has not commented on the leaks itself, the DIY repair folks at iFixit tested out the possibility by buying a brand-new 2018 MacBook Pro, pulling it apart and replacing the display. Shocker: it still worked, even without the software.

Source: iFixit

iMac Pro, 2018 MacBook Pros require Apple software for certain repairs

In new Apple computers with its custom T2 chip (currently the iMac Pro and MacBook Pro 2018 models) it serves the purpose of “the System Management Controller, image signal processor, audio controller, and SSD controller.” That means it can handle the system’s secure boot system and on the fly encryption, as well as image processing for the FaceTime camera. While the enhanced security is nice, it has additional implications.

According to MacRumors and shown on documents posted by Motherboard, anyone doing significant repair work on these systems will be left with a nonfunctioning system until they run the “Apple Service Toolkit 2” diagnostic software. For the MacBook Pro that includes “display assembly, logic board, top case (the keyboard, touchpad, and internal housing), and Touch ID board,” and on the iMac Pro, it’s the logic board or SSD.

Source: MacRumors, Motherboard

Surface Pro 6 vs. the competition: More than just portability

Last year’s Surface Pro was a satisfying, if unambitious entry to Microsoft’s brand of hybrid laptops. With its sixth iteration the line is offering a load of refinements like a higher contrast ratio for the screen. However, in a crowded marketplace full of lightweight hybrids and convertibles, what helps the Surface Pro stand apart? We’ve taken leading machines from Dell, HP and even last year’s MacBook Air and laid their key specs out to see exactly what each offers under the hood.

Surface Laptop 2 vs. the competition: Power and price

After years of good hybrid machines Microsoft finally built a regular laptop in 2017, scoring a home run on the first swing. We were excited by the design, screen and battery life, but less thrilled about the limited port selection. Over a year later the sequel is here and looks like it’ll continue that string of excellence — though the connection options haven’t improved. If you’re still on the fence about your next machine, we’ve lined some of the more outstanding models for your benefit so you can see which one might suit you best as you gear up for the fall.

Try macOS Mojave’s Dark Mode on these apps

It’s been a few weeks since Apple announced that macOS Mojave would launch today — in that time, many app developers have been at work getting their creations ready for the new OS. Probably one of the changes Mac users want to see first and foremost is support for Dark Mode. While it doesn’t make any functional difference, it’s a nice visual redesign that a lot of users might prefer to the older Mac UI. But apps that aren’t updated stick out like a sore thumb — so the faster key apps get updated, the better.

Trump will reportedly spare Apple products from latest China tariffs

If you were scrambling to buy the latest Apple Watch out of concern that Trump’s next round of tariffs could lead to price hikes, you can likely relax. Bloomberg sources have claimed that the new tariffs don’t affect a technology category that covers many of Apple’s products, including the Watch, AirPods, the HomePod and Beats headphones. This is also likely to exempt comparable products from other companies, such as Fitbit’s activity trackers and Sonos’ speakers, but the scoop only mentioned Apple’s by name.

Source: Bloomberg

Trump tells Apple to build more US plants in response to tariffs

If Apple was hoping to elicit sympathy for the potential impact of US tariffs on product prices… well, it’s not going to get any from the highest levels of government. In one of his characteristic weekend Twitter sprees, President Trump acknowledged that product prices might go up, but insisted that there would be an “easy solution:” make the products in the US. “Start building new plants now,” Trump said.

Via: Variety

Source: Donald Trump (Twitter)

Apple is creating an online portal for law enforcement data requests

Apple and law enforcement have had a contentious relationship, frequently butting heads over what level of access Apple should provide officials when approached. The issue came into a rather public spotlight in 2016 when the FBI took Apple to court over its refusal to unlock an iPhone belonging to the San Bernardino shooter. But, in an effort to work with officials, Apple has provided training for law enforcement officers on what sorts of data are available from Apple and the legal processes for obtaining it. Now, it’s expanding that program and developing an online portal through which officials can submit requests for data.

Source: CNET, Apple

Apple is creating an online portal for law enforcement data requests

Apple and law enforcement have had a contentious relationship, frequently butting heads over what level of access Apple should provide officials when approached. The issue came into a rather public spotlight in 2016 when the FBI took Apple to court over its refusal to unlock an iPhone belonging to the San Bernardino shooter. But, in an effort to work with officials, Apple has provided training for law enforcement officers on what sorts of data are available from Apple and the legal processes for obtaining it. Now, it’s expanding that program and developing an online portal through which officials can submit requests for data.

Source: CNET, Apple

Top-grossing Mac App Store app steals users’ browser histories

Adware Doctor is a top app in Apple’s Mac App Store, sitting at number five in the list of top paid apps and leading the list of top utilities apps, as of writing. It says it’s meant to prevent “malware and malicious files from infecting your Mac” and claims to be one of the best apps to do so, but unbeknownst to its users, it’s also stealing their browser history and downloading it to servers in China.

Via: TechCrunch

Source: Objective-See

Apple’s iOS 12 beta is driving everyone crazy

Apple promised a lot of bells and whistles with its iOS 12 update — better performance, grouped notifications and the coveted Pixar-like Memojis, for example — but its pre-launch spiel never mentioned the surprise feature everyone on the public beta is talking about today. Thanks to, presumably, a bug, iPhones are showing update notifications every time you unlock your phone, without an option to actually install the update.

Source: Twitter [@m4tt]

Square finally has a Lightning card reader for newer iPhones

If you have a newer iPhone, it’s been a pain to take payments from magstripe cards using a Square reader — without a native headphone jack, you’ve had to plug in a dongle and hold it steady while you serve a customer. Isn’t Square overdue for a more iPhone-friendly version? Thankfully, it’s here. You now have the option of a magstripe reader with a Lightning connection instead of the usual 3.5mm plug. There’s nothing new apart from the port compatibility, but the identical $10 price makes it an easy choice if you run an iPhone-centric shop.

Source: Square

Apple teaches photo editing with over-the-phone classes

Many device makers give you the tools to capture and edit great photos, but they seldom teach you how to make the most of those tools. Apple thinks it can — and unlike in the past, you don’t need to show up in person to develop your skills. The company has launched an over-the-phone training program that teaches you how to edit with Photos (both iOS and macOS) in a 30-minute one-on-one session with a specialist. It’ll both show how to use simple adjustments like Auto Enhance as well as deeper edits like color balance and exposure. If you have Live Photos or Portrait mode pictures from your mobile devices, you’ll learn how to edit those as well.

Via: Cult of Mac, PetaPixel

Source: Apple