Browser vendors unite to end support for 20-year-old TLS 1.0

A green exterior door is sealed with a padlock.

Enlarge (credit: Indigo girl / Flickr)

Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla have announced a unified plan to deprecate the use of TLS 1.0 and 1.1 early in 2020.

TLS (Transport Layer Security) is used to secure connections on the Web. TLS is essential to the Web, providing the ability to form connections that are confidential, authenticated, and tamper-proof. This has made it a big focus of security research, and over the years, a number of bugs that had significant security implications have been found in the protocol. Revisions have been published to address these flaws.

The original TLS 1.0, heavily based on Netscape’s SSL 3.0, was first published in January 1999. TLS 1.1 arrived in 2006, while TLS 1.2, in 2008, added new capabilities and fixed these security flaws. Irreparable security flaws in SSL 3.0 saw support for that

Continue reading “Browser vendors unite to end support for 20-year-old TLS 1.0”

Google Pixel 3 XL vs. iPhone XS Max: Which Camera Reigns Supreme?

Google’s newest flagship smartphones, the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL, are officially launching later this week. With their high-quality cameras, fast processors, and other improvements, the new devices are direct competitors to Apple’s newly released iPhone XS models.

We were able to get our hands on the new Pixel 3 and Pixel 3XL ahead of their debut, and in our latest YouTube video, we compared the Google Pixel 3 XL camera to Apple’s iPhone XS Max camera to see which one reigns supreme.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.


Both the Pixel 3 and the Pixel 3 XL are equipped with a single-lens 12-megapixel rear camera system, while the iPhone XS Max uses a dual-lens camera system that features a 12-megapixel wide-angle lens and a 12-megapixel telephoto lens.



The two camera system allows the iPhone XS Max to do things like capture Portrait Mode images with

Continue reading “Google Pixel 3 XL vs. iPhone XS Max: Which Camera Reigns Supreme?”

Why is a Lisbon soccer team trying to unmask Portuguese bloggers in US court?

Pizzi of SL Benfica in action during the Liga NOS match between SL Benfica and FC Porto at Estadio da Luz on October 7, 2018 in Lisbon, Portugal.

Enlarge / Pizzi of SL Benfica in action during the Liga NOS match between SL Benfica and FC Porto at Estadio da Luz on October 7, 2018 in Lisbon, Portugal. (credit: Gualter Fatia/Getty Images)

In April 2018, a professional Portuguese soccer team sued three major American tech companies—Google, Cloudflare, and Automattic—in federal court in Los Angeles.

The soccer club, Benfica, alleged that the American companies were partially responsible for disseminating internal memos, presentations, and emails obtained via a 2017 phishing attack against it.

However, in recent weeks, American lawyers for Benfica agreed to remove the tech firms from the lawsuit, most of whom had formally filed motions to dismiss previously.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Five graphics from Google show how carbon-intensive its data centers really are

Solar panels on Google rooftop

Enlarge / Solar panels sit on the roof of Google headquarters in Mountain View. (credit: Kimberly White/Corbis via Getty Images)

Google has long been a carbon-neutral company in a theoretical sense. That is, even when it’s physically impossible for Google’s data centers and offices to consume renewable energy, the company offsets that “dirty” energy with “clean” energy purchases at other times and locations.

The problem is, this does not make Google carbon-neutral in a practical sense, because the company still needs polluting energy sources to keep functioning. In a new report (PDF), Google has acknowledged this limitation and offered a few interesting graphics showing how much carbon-free energy its data centers actually consume.

The report is interesting not just because Google is the largest corporate buyer of renewable energy in the world but also because it shows Google is heading off criticism that has been lobbed at all kinds

Continue reading “Five graphics from Google show how carbon-intensive its data centers really are”

Five graphics from Google show how carbon-intensive its data centers really are

Solar panels on Google rooftop

Enlarge / Solar panels sit on the roof of Google headquarters in Mountain View. (credit: Kimberly White/Corbis via Getty Images)

Google has long been a carbon-neutral company in a theoretical sense. That is, even when it’s physically impossible for Google’s data centers and offices to consume renewable energy, the company offsets that “dirty” energy with “clean” energy purchases at other times and locations.

The problem is, this does not make Google carbon-neutral in a practical sense, because the company still needs polluting energy sources to keep functioning. In a new report (PDF), Google has acknowledged this limitation and offered a few interesting graphics showing how much carbon-free energy its data centers actually consume.

The report is interesting not just because Google is the largest corporate buyer of renewable energy in the world but also because it shows Google is heading off criticism that has been lobbed at all kinds

Continue reading “Five graphics from Google show how carbon-intensive its data centers really are”

Senators to Google: Why didn’t you disclose Google+ vulnerability sooner?

Article intro image

Enlarge / The Google Plus (G+, or Google +) social network logo is seen in the company’s offices behind Android toys on August 21, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. (credit: Adam Berry/Getty Images)

Three United States senators have demanded that Google provide answers about its recent disclosure of a security breach in its Google+ social network that lead to its closure. Google only came forward after the Wall Street Journal broke the story on October 8.

So far, one federal proposed class-action lawsuit has been filed in the wake of the episode.

In a Thursday letter sent to Google CEO Sundar Pichai, Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), and Sen. Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) have asked a number of pointed questions of the tech giant.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Chrome OS may be the 2-in-1 solution we’ve been waiting for

Tech’s biggest companies are all about the 2-in-1. Google’s latest effort is the Pixel Slate — a tablet that becomes a sort-of laptop when you snap on its keyboard folio. This is a formula we’ve seen rise in popularity since the first Surface tablet. Think: the iPad Pro, Samsung’s Galaxy Tab S4, HP’s Envy x2 detachables and more. These devices are doing so well they’re apparently all people want to buy anymore. According to IDC data, 2-in-1 shipments will grow by almost 10 percent this year, while traditional PCs are expected to decline.

Wireless charging: Are we doing this or not?

The world is going increasingly wireless, with hardware manufacturers left and right eschewing physical ports and cables for digital handshakes and gigahertz connections. Just look at Apple’s infamous headphone jack-eliminating AirPods, for example. However, one plug that device makers have continually struggled to remove is the one that supplies the gadget with power. The era of wireless mobile device charging has been “right around the corner” for the better part of a decade but will Google’s latest foray into Qi-enabled charging technology finally be the popular push that brings wireless power transfers into the mainstream?

Pixel Slate vs. the competition: Get some work done

We weren’t too thrilled with the first attempt at putting Chrome OS on a tablet, with Acer’s Chromebook Tab 10 getting slammed for its bad cameras and poor performance — and the fact that Chrome OS hadn’t really been optimized for the form factor yet. Maybe things will be a bit better when Google takes the helm with its new Pixel Slate. We have fond memories of tablets like the Nexus 9 from 2014, as well as last year’s Pixelbook laptop. We don’t quite know yet how this new device will fare until we formally review it, but we certainly know what it’s competing against, and can compare specs in this handy chart.

Pixel 3 XL vs. the competition: Beyond the notch

With all the leaks over the past few weeks it may have seemed there wasn’t a lot more to reveal about the Pixel 3 XL. But, after today’s announcement, we finally have some official confirmation of its internals, including a whopper of a front camera in that notch. While you’ll have to wait a few weeks for our official review of Google’s newest large handset, we can at least stack up the XL against its closest competition. Check out the table below to see how the specs fare against behemoths like the Galaxy Note 9, the budget-priced OnePlus 6 (the 6T is still a few weeks away) and of course, Apple’s mega-sized iPhone XS Max.

Pixel 3 vs. the competition: Under the surface

It’s October, which means we finally get an official look at Google’s big phone release for 2018. The Pixel 3 may look plain on the outside, but it’s packed with improved front and back cameras with souped-up software that we hope will make the shooters better than their predecessors. Of course, to find out we’ll have to wait for the full review in a few weeks. For now, we can take a look at the handset’s specs and see how it stands up to this year’s crop of flagship phones. Check out the table below:

Google Announces Pixel 3 Smartphone, ‘Home Hub’ Smart Speaker, and Pixel Slate Tablet

Google today held its annual “Made by Google” fall event, unveiling a new line of products that included the all-new Google Pixel 3 smartphone, a screen-based smart speaker, and a new tablet. Notably, Google pointed out at the beginning of its presentation that 2018 marks the 20 year anniversary of the search giant.



The central announcement at the event was the 5.5-inch Google Pixel 3 and 6.3-inch Pixel 3 XL. The Pixel 3 XL has an edge-to-edge display and a notch at the top of the smartphone that holds its front-facing camera system, akin to iPhone X onwards. Unlike Apple’s smartphones, the Pixel 3 XL has a chin on the bottom of the device.

The company focused on the Pixel 3’s advanced camera, including an HDR+ mode and “Top Shot,” which automatically captures multiple shots with HDR+ and recommends one that might be better than your photo. Night

Continue reading “Google Announces Pixel 3 Smartphone, ‘Home Hub’ Smart Speaker, and Pixel Slate Tablet”

Pixel Slate hands-on: Google’s 2-in-1 takes on the Surface

Google is cooking up a new formula for detachables, and it has an intriguing recipe with the new Pixel Slate. Though Microsoft has a solid desktop environment in Windows that makes its Surfaces excellent productivity tablets, it doesn’t have the same library of touch-friendly apps that Android and iOS offer. The iPad Pro, on the other hand, is swimming in apps but just doesn’t have the multitasking chops of a full desktop OS. Chrome OS seems like a potential opportunity to marry the best of Android, with its plethora of apps, with an established, functional desktop interface.

Google+ users, upset over data leak, sue Google

Article intro image

Enlarge (credit: Chesnot/Getty Images)

It was only a matter of time—the same day that Google announced it was shutting down Google+ in the wake of a data leak, two users filed a proposed class-action lawsuit in federal court in San Francisco, saying that their privacy had been violated.

The case, Matt Matic and Zak Harris v. Google, alleges that the company’s “lax approach” to security resulted in API bugs that exposed the private details of almost 500,000 Google+ users.

“Worse, after discovery of this vulnerability in the Google+ platform, Defendants kept silent for at least seven months, making a calculated decision not to inform users that their Personal Information was compromised, further compromising the privacy of consumers‘ information and exposing them to risk of identity theft or worse,” Joshua Watson, the attorney for Matic and Harris wrote in the civil complaint filed on Monday.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs |

Continue reading “Google+ users, upset over data leak, sue Google”

Google announces its first tablet in three years, the Pixel Slate

Article intro image

Enlarge (credit: Google)

After the death of Android tablets, Google has been slowly rebooting its tablet ambitions under the Chrome OS banner. After debuting the concept with the Acer Chromebook Tab 10, Google now has its first-party Chrome OS tablet hardware, the Pixel Slate.

The device has a more-than-passing resemblance to the Microsoft Surface or iPad Pro: there’s a tablet, and a keyboard cover, and a pen. The tablet is an Intel-powered device with 8-16GB of RAM and a 3000×2000 display. Single USB-C ports are found on the left and right sides, and a pogo pin connection is on the bottom.

This is the first Chrome OS device to support biometrics—on the top of the device is a power button that doubles as a fingerprint scanner. Inside, Google has a Titan security chip (originally designed for its cloud servers) to protect against various kinds of tampering and provide safe

Continue reading “Google announces its first tablet in three years, the Pixel Slate”

Google Shuttering Google+ for Consumers After Undisclosed Data Breach

The Google+ social network that Google introduced back in 2011 suffered a major data breach that Google opted not to disclose to the public, reports The Wall Street Journal.

A Google+ software glitch provided outside developers with the ability to access private Google+ profile data from 2015 to March 2018. In the spring of this year, internal investigators discovered the issue and fixed it.

The problem was caused by a bug in a Google+ API designed to let app developers access profile and contact information about the people who signed up to use their apps. Google found that Google+ was also allowing developers to access the data of users who had their profiles set to private. Up to 438 apps had access to customer data.

During a two-week period in late March, Google ran tests to determine the impact of the bug, one of the people said. It found 496,951

Continue reading “Google Shuttering Google+ for Consumers After Undisclosed Data Breach”

Echo Show 2018 review: More to tap, more to see, more to do

Article intro image

Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino)

Lost among the slew of Amazon’s recent device announcements was an update to the Echo Show. While Amazon absolutely mentioned the second-generation smart display, you may have overlooked it completely amidst all the other devices that debuted: a new Echo Dot, the Chromecast-like Echo Input, that infamous smart microwave, etc. But while it  may not have grabbed as many headlines, Amazon gave the $229 Echo Show a fairly significant facelift with a bigger screen, more powerful speakers, and a redesigned outer shell.

The Echo Show remains the primary device that gives Alexa a “face” of sorts. But with that face comes the challenge of managing users’ interactions with Alexa. Amazon’s other Echo devices make Alexa interactions painfully simple—ask, and the virtual assistant answers. The Echo Show, and similar devices, both enrich and complicate interactions with virtual assistants with its touchscreen display.

Amazon admits it’s still

Continue reading “Echo Show 2018 review: More to tap, more to see, more to do”

Google taking new steps to prevent malicious Chrome extensions

Article intro image

Google has announced plans to further restrict Chrome extensions in a bid to crack down on the number of malicious extensions found in the Chrome Web Store.

We’ve seen a spate of malicious extensions this year; the extensions do things like steal credentials and participate in click fraud schemes. The malicious extensions take advantage of the considerable access to Web pages that extensions have.

Google has already taken some steps to limit malicious extensions. Last year, a stricter multi-process model was applied to extensions to limit the impact of security flaws in the browser, and earlier this year Google deprecated the ability for extensions to offer installation from third-party websites (instead forcing all installations to go via the Chrome Web Store). This feature will be fully removed in Chrome 71 in December.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

California requires companies to include women on their boards

On Sunday, California Governor Jerry Brown signed a bill into law that will require publicly traded companies headquartered in the state to have women on their boards of directors. As per the law, by the end of next year, these companies must include at least one woman on their boards and by 2021, they’ll be required to have up to three depending on how many directors make up their boards. Those found to be in violation of the law will initially be fined $100,000, and subsequent violations will result in fines of $300,000.

Via: Recode

Source: Governor Jerry Brown, California Senate

Google Maps Adds Commuting Features

Google has announced that later this week, it will add several new features to its Maps app for iOS and Android commuters. The update includes live, personalized traffic data, support for ‘mixed-mode’ commutes, real-time bus and train tracking, and integration with Apple Music, Google Play Music, and Spotify.

The update will include a dedicated ‘Commute’ tab in the Maps app. After users identify their commute, Google Maps will provide live traffic data about the route. The Android app will also include notifications about delays as they happen so you can adjust your trip.

Google Maps will also support mixed-mode commutes. That means, for example, commuters who travel by car, train, and on foot will see commute information relevant to each leg of their journey. Real-time bus and train tracking is being added in 80 cities worldwide too.

Playback controls for Apple Music, Spotify, and Google Play Music is coming to Continue reading “Google Maps Adds Commuting Features”