Apple video service may charge $10 each for HBO, Showtime and Starz


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Apple’s video service event is just hours away, but there are still a few rumors making the rounds — including, apparently, pricing. Wall Street Journal contacts claim Apple has been negotiating to offer subscriptions to channels “such as” HBO, Showtime and Starz for $10 each through its new TV app, which would also include Apple’s original programming. In that light, it would be closer to Amazon’s Prime Video Channels, where the focus is on convenient access to third party services.

Source: Wall Street Journal

Apple’s rumored game service wouldn’t include ‘freemium’ titles


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It’s now a little clearer how Apple’s rumored game subscription service might work — including what you wouldn’t get. Bloomberg sources claim the service will bundle paid games (most likely the more popular ones) for a flat monthly rate, and would likely exclude “freemium” games where you need to make an in-app purchase to unlock everything. Don’t expect to get a Fortnite Battle Pass or Super Mario Run, then.

Source: Bloomberg

What to expect from Apple’s streaming video event


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Can Apple actually take on Netflix, Hulu and Amazon in the increasingly crowded world of streaming video? We’re about to find out on March 25th, when Apple is expected to give us a glimpse at its long-awaited video service. It’s something the company has been building out in the open over the past few years, so it’s not exactly a secret. After high profile flops like Planet of the Apps and Carpool Karaoke, it’s a bit tough to feel that excited about whatever Apple is cooking up — but there’s always the chance that it could offer something truly unique.

Apple iPad Air hands-on (2019): Just ‘Pro’ enough


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It used to be that, if you wanted to buy the best possible iPad, you splurged on an iPad Air. It wasn’t just sleek — it was terribly powerful, too. (Well, for the time, anyway.) In 2015, though, the company launched the iPad Pro, and before long, the iPad Air line was discontinued and left to the annals of Apple history. Until now, that is.

Apple iPad mini hands-on (2019): A love letter to old fans


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I’ve always been really fond of Apple’s iPad mini; I bought the first one as a Mother’s Day gift, and the iPad mini 4 was one of the first big reviews I ever wrote for Engadget. Unfortunately, Apple hasn’t shown its smallest tablet nearly as much affection — as I write this, it’s been over three years since the company gave the mini a refresh. In that time, we’ve seen Apple launch and redesign a line of pro-grade tablets and build a stunningly competent entry-level model. Frankly, I had nearly given up on the mini entirely — that is, until Apple announced a refreshed model earlier this week.

Apple rolls out pastel Watch bands and iPhone cases for spring


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Apple has revealed new Watch bands and iPhone cases for spring, and they sure look like an explosion of colorful pastel hues to fit the season. You can now get an iPhone XS or XS Max silicone case ($39) in Spearmint, Papaya and Delft Blue, and the XS Smart Battery Case ($129) in Pink Sand. Meanwhile, the iPhone XS Max Leather Folio ($129) and Case ($49), as well as the iPhone XS Leather Folio ($99) and Case ($49), are now available in Lilac, Sunset and Cornflower.

Via: MacRumors

Source: Apple

Apple’s news service adds the Wall Street Journal at the last minute


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Whatever trouble Apple has had recruiting publishers for its paid news service, it appears to have scored at least one big coup. New York Times tipsters claim the Wall Street Journal has agreed to join the service mere days ahead of Apple’s March 25th event. It’s not certain what prompted the decision, although Apple’s pitch has reportedly centered on giving publications access to millions of new readers.

Source: New York Times

Apple’s new AirPods offer longer battery life and wireless charging case


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Apple’s hardware trojan horse continues to gallop a week ahead of its “show time” event next Monday. We’ve seen two new iPads and an iMac update, and now its increasingly ubiquitous AirPods are up. The rumors have been around for a while as to what was next for the AirPods. Noise cancellation? All kinds of wireless charging? Always-on Siri? How about some, but not all, of the above?

Apple backs news literacy programs in US and Italy


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Apple is joining the fight against fake news by teaming up with three groups that offer news literacy training for young people. The company announced that the News Literacy Project and Common Sense, both based in the US, and Osservatorio Permanente Giovani-Editori in Italy would receive support from Apple in their efforts. “We’ve been impressed by the important work being done by the News Literacy Project, Common Sense and Osservatorio, empowering young people to be active and engaged citizens,” said Apple CEO Tim Cook in a press release.

Source: Apple

Apple dropped the price on several expensive Mac upgrades


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Apple’s iMac updates weren’t the only changes the company made today. With less fanfare, it also lowered the cost of SSD upgrades for the MacBook Air, MacBook Pro and Mac mini. It lowered the cost to upgrade the 2013 Mac Pro RAM, too. These changes were first spotted by MacRumors. While they make the priciest SSD upgrades less expensive, the more reasonable upgrades — the ones most people might actually buy — haven’t changed.

Via: MacRumors (1), (2)

Source: Apple

The iPad Air seems boring, but I want one anyway


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When Apple released the impressive and wildly expensive iPad Pro last fall, I started thinking that the company could use an iPad XR. I imagined a tablet that takes the high tech found in the new iPad Pro, but cuts some corners to make it more approachable to the masses. The new iPad Air isn’t that. Instead, it’s like the 10.5-inch iPad Pro from 2017, except with a price cut and a few spec bumps. That’s not very exciting. What’s more, the iPad Air doesn’t have the flashy bezel-less display, Face ID sensor and support for the new Apple Pencil like the existing iPad Pro.

But compared to the basic $329 iPad, the new iPad Air has worthwhile improvements: a bigger, better screen, a much newer processor, more storage and support for Apple’s Smart Keyboard accessory. It’s a logical step up from the base iPad, and it Continue reading “The iPad Air seems boring, but I want one anyway”

Apple’s upcoming video service won’t offer live sports at launch


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Whatever video service Apple unveils at its March 25th event, live sports won’t be a part of it. The company’s Eddy Cue told Sports Illustrated in an interview that there was “not a lot” of thought about competing with Amazon or Facebook to secure rights for live games. While Cue didn’t rule it out in the future, he noted that sports rights are “deeply fragmented” based on where, what and how you watch. A service that focuses on obtaining rights is “always going to be tiny,” he said.

Source: Sports Illustrated

‘Angry Birds AR’ on iOS lets you fling fowl in the real world


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Angry Birds has already made the leap from smartphones to augmented reality and VR. But now, Rovio is bringing some of those lessons back to the iPhone. With Angry Birds AR: Isle of Pigs, the latest game in the blockbuster franchise, you’ll be able to take down evil swine in your living room — or anywhere else you can find a flat surface. It uses Apple’s ARKit to construct virtual stages atop the real world, while you use your phone as a slingshot to topple them with irate birds. Isle of Pigs is available for pre-order today on iOS devices, and it’ll officially launch as a free app later this spring (you can bet there will be a plethora of micro-transactions).

Apple’s 2019 iMac gets some fresh chips, including an eight-core CPU


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It’s shaping up to be a busy week for Apple. Yesterday the company unveiled two updated iPads, and today it announced the iMac is getting a minor refresh. Going forward, the 21.5-inch model will be offered with an eighth-gen six-core Intel Core i5 CPU at the high end, plus 4GB AMD Radeon Pro Vega 20 graphics. That top-tier sku will also include an eighth-gen six-core Core i7 processor as a configure-to-order option. At the entry-level, the 21.5-inch model starts with a dual-core seventh-generation Core i5 processor, and then moves up to configurations with eighth-gen quad-core chips.

The 27-inch model, meanwhile, will be offered with a minimum of six cores (Core i5). Upgrade options include an eighth-generation Core i7 chip and a ninth-gen eight-core Core i9 upgrade option — a first for this product line. The 27-incher also steps up to an 8GB Radeon Pro Vega 48 GPU, Continue reading “Apple’s 2019 iMac gets some fresh chips, including an eight-core CPU”

Apple’s updated iPad Air and Mini support eSIMs


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The iPad mini and iPad Air Apple quietly announced ahead of its big March event will come with eSIM support. Cupertino’s latest iPad Pros have eSIM support, as well, but these new entries are the first non-Pro models with the feature. While the Apple SIM works similarly — and present in older non-Pro iPads — it’s only compatible with the tech giant’s partner carriers. By giving these devices eSIM support, they’ll be able to work even on the networks of non-partner carriers.

Via: Engadget Japanese

Source: Apple

Apple quietly announces 10.5-inch iPad Air and refreshed iPad mini


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Apple’s online store went dark earlier this morning, and now it’s clear why: The company decided to quietly roll out not one, but two new iPads ahead of its big event next week. The new, larger, 10.5-inch iPad Air will arrive with a 70 percent performance boost compared to its predecessor, thanks to the company’s A12 Bionic chip with Apple’s Neural Engine. That’ll be useful alongside the now 20-percent larger display — which is compatible with the first-gen Apple Pencil too.

Source: Apple

Stanford study finds Apple Watch can detect irregular heart rhythms


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Stanford has released the results of its Apple Watch-based heart study more than a year after it began, and it appears to have been a success, with a few caveats. Only 0.5 percent of the more than 400,000 volunteers received warnings of irregular heart rhythms, but physicians later verified that 84 percent of those notifications were atrial fibrillation episodes and thus potential signs of trouble. To put it another way, the technology both avoided a glut of false positives (a major concern going into the study) and was reliable enough that it was worth a follow-up with doctors.

Source: Stanford, Apple Newsroom